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Troilus and Criseyde

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Amphiorax

Amphiorax  

(the -ax is probably a French spelling for -aus), an Argive hero who had taken part in the Calydonian boar hunt (see Meleagre) and the expedition of the Argonauts (see ...
Antenor

Antenor  

(Walton: Troilus and Cressida). Bar. Capt. of the Trojans, he is captured by the Greeks and returned in exchange for Cressida. Created (1954) by Geraint Evans.
Athamas

Athamas  

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Mythical king of Orchomenus, husband of Ino and father of Phrixus, Helle, Melicertes, and Learchus. The first two were the children of Nephelē (‘Cloud’), Athamas' first wife; their stepmother Ino ...
aubade

aubade  

(Provençal, alba; German, Tagelied),a dawn song, usually describing the regret of two lovers at their imminent separation. The form (which has no strict metrical pattern) flourished with the ...
auctour and auctoritee

auctour and auctoritee  

(L. auctor and auctoritas). The ME words can mean respectively ‘creator, originator’ as well as ‘author’, and ‘authority’ in its legal, political, and ecclesiastical senses. However, when used of ...
audience

audience  

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The role of the theatre audience has been both preserved and challenged in the twentieth century. The set of conventions for mainstream theatre, requiring a particular response to the on-stage ...
Benoît de Sainte-Maure

Benoît de Sainte-Maure  

A 12th‐cent. trouvère patronized by Henry II of England, for whom he composed a verse history of the dukes of Normandy. His best‐known work is the Roman de Troie, based on the writings of Dares ...
Caliope

Caliope  

Chief of the Muses, and muse of epic poetry, the mother of Orpheus (Bo III m.12:23), ‘the myghty Muse’ (HF 1400), invoked at the beginning of book III of Troilus ...
Calkas

Calkas  

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Music, Opera
(Walton: Troilus and Cressida). Bass. High Priest of Pallas, father of Cressida. He admits to his daughter that he is going to desert to the Trojans. Once there, he encourages Cressida to marry the ...
Canon of Chaucer's Works

Canon of Chaucer's Works  

(see also entries for individual works). It is not always easy to establish the authentic works of a medieval writer. They often exist in MSS copied after the author's death ...
Cassandra

Cassandra  

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In myth, daughter of Priam and Hecuba. In Homer she is mentioned as being the most beautiful of Priam's daughters, and she is the first to see her father bringing home the body of Hector. The Sack of ...
celestial sphere

celestial sphere  

The imaginary sphere, centred on the observer, on which all celestial bodies such as the Sun, Moon, and stars appear to be located. The positions of certain atmospheric optical phenomena are often ...
Cerberus

Cerberus  

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Monstrous hound that guards the entrance to the Underworld, often called ‘the dog of Hades’. Hesiod makes him a child of Echidna and Typhon, ‘brass‐voiced and fifty‐headed’; three heads are more ...
Ceres

Ceres  

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In Roman mythology, the corn goddess, the equivalent of the Greek Demeter.In astronomy, Ceres is the name of the first asteroid to be discovered, found by G. Piazzi of Palermo on 1 January 1801.
characterization

characterization  

The representation of persons in narrative and dramatic works. This may include direct methods like the attribution of qualities in description or commentary, and indirect (or ‘dramatic’) methods ...
chronology of Chaucer's works

chronology of Chaucer's works  

Because of the paucity of clear contemporary references and the absence of external evidence, the dating of the works is only approximate (for fuller details, see the individual titles). Even ...
classical antiquity

classical antiquity  

(see also classical literature). Medieval illustrations of the siege of Troy show a walled town (sometimes with a drawbridge) and battles between knights in armour . Modern readers of Troilus ...
classical literature

classical literature  

(see also classical antiquity; Latin; Geoffrey Chaucer: reading). Medieval writers did not make as strict a distinction between classical and later Latin literature as did the humanists of the ...
Cleo

Cleo  

The muse of history, invoked at the beginning of the second book of Troilus and Criseyde. A gloss in one MS calls her ‘mistress of eloquence’ (domina eloquencie): in the Middle Ages she was also ...
complaint

complaint  

(a poetic form derived from the Latin planctus), bewailing the vicissitudes of life (as in Hoccleve's Complaint) or addressed to a more particular end (such as Chaucer's ‘Complaint to his Purse’). ...

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