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anniversaries

anniversaries  

It was early in the 3rd c. that the Christians seem to have got into the habit of commemorating the dead on the anniversary of their decease, at first designated ...
broad-bottom administration

broad-bottom administration  

Was the facetious name given to the coalition formed in December 1744, at the expense of Carteret and Pulteney. Henry Pelham, his brother Newcastle and Lord Hardwicke were joined by ...
Cavaliers

Cavaliers  

Nickname for the royalists who fought for Charles I during the civil wars. Like ‘roundhead’, ‘cavalier’ originated as a term of abuse. Stemming from the Spanish word caballero, it was meant to ...
Church of Ireland

Church of Ireland  

Building on 4th‐cent. traces, Patrick evangelized Ireland (c.432) and developed a distinctively Celtic Christianity, but with the partial Anglo‐Norman conquest of Ireland the church again joined ...
Conservative Party

Conservative Party  

The less reformist of the (normally) two main parties in British politics. It has a longer history than any other political party, perhaps anywhere, with an institutional continuity under that name ...
Declarations of Indulgence

Declarations of Indulgence  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Four proclamations issued by Charles II and James II of England in an attempt to achieve religious toleration. Charles II issued Declarations in 1662 and 1672, stating that the penal laws against ...
Glorious Revolution

Glorious Revolution  

Title given to the revolution of 1688–9, which resulted in the ‘abdication’ of James II and the succession of William III and Mary II. Participants had differing objectives. Tories and Anglican ...
Henry Cooke

Henry Cooke  

(1788–1868),ultra-Protestant apologist. Born near Maghera, Co. Derry, he was educated at Glasgow University. He united the Church of Ireland and the Presbyterian Church against ‘Romanism’ in the ...
High Churchmen

High Churchmen  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
The group in the Church of England which gives a high place to the authority and antiquity of the church, to the episcopate, and to sacraments. The title is first attested at the end of the 17th ...
Independent Opposition Party

Independent Opposition Party  

The realization of an idea occasionally mooted during the O'Connell era but difficult to achieve because of the affinity of Irish Catholic MPs (including the Liberator himself) for the fellow‐ship ...
Jacobitism

Jacobitism  

Was a series of political movements which supported the restoration of the exiled house of Stuart after James II had been ousted from the throne at the Glorious Revolution in 1688 and had fled to ...
landlord

landlord  

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Overview Page
An owner of land who leases it to a tenant by way of a tenancy agreement. The tenant is the lessee. See lease; tenancy.
Lichfield House compact

Lichfield House compact  

This was an agreement in the London house of Lord Lichfield on 18 February 1835 between the Whigs, radicals, and Irish to work together in the forthcoming parliamentary session. Peel's ...
Londonderry

Londonderry  

Landed family and political magnates in Co. down from the 18th century. The family initially received land in Co. Donegal during the plantation of Ulster. Robert Stewart (1739–1821) purchased the ...
Lord Orford Robert Walpole

Lord Orford Robert Walpole  

(1676–1745).Traditionally known as Britain's first prime minister. From a Norfolk gentry family, Walpole was the Whig MP for Castle Rising (1701–2) and King's Lynn (1702–12, 1713–42). His first posts ...
Mathew

Mathew  

Prominent Catholic landed family in Co. Tipperary. George Mathew of Glamorgan (d. 1636) married Elizabeth, widow of Viscount Thurles. The protection of the duke of Ormond, whose brother had been ...
Oliver Plunket

Oliver Plunket  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(1625–81),archbishop of Armagh, martyr. Born of a noble, royalist family at Loughcrew (Co. Meath), he studied under Jesuit guidance at the Irish College, Rome, from 1645 at the expense of the ...
Ormond

Ormond  

A premier Anglo‐Norman family deriving its name from the office of an ancestor, Theobald Walter, butler in the household of Prince John, whom he accompanied to Ireland in 1185. The ...
palatines

palatines  

Protestant refugees from the Rhineland palatinate in Germany who arrived in England in 1709. Eight hundred and twenty‐one families, containing more than 3,000 persons, were sent on to Ireland. By ...
rapparee

rapparee  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
An 18th-cent. Irish Jacobite irregular, from ropairí (half-pikes), the customary weapon of the Catholics who attacked Protestants in the period of the Williamite War. At the collapse of the Jacobite ...

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