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Timaeus

(c. 350—260 bc)

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Agathocles

Agathocles  

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Tyrant, later king of Syracuse, born 361/0 bc in Thermae, Sicily. His father Carcinus, an exile from Rhegium, received Syracusan citizenship under Timoleon 343/2 and owned a large pottery ...
Aristodemus Malacus

Aristodemus Malacus  

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(‘the Effeminate’), tyrant of Cumae, 504–c. 490 bc. An account of the career of this colourful tyrant in Dionysius (7) of Halicarnassus (7. 3–11) derives, probably via Timaeus (2) from ...
Callias

Callias  

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Of Syracuse, lived at the court of Agathocles (1), tyrant of Syracuse (316–289 bc), and wrote a history of his reign in 22 books. It so favoured Agathocles that Callias ...
Carthage

Carthage  

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An ancient city on the coast of North Africa near present-day Tunis. Founded by the Phoenicians c.814 bc, Carthage became a major force in the Mediterranean, and came into conflict with Rome in the ...
Cato the Elder

Cato the Elder  

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‘Cato the Censor’ (234–149bc) (‘Censorius’) was a dominant figure in both the political and the cultural life of Rome in the first half of the 2nd cent. bc. A novus homo (roughly, the first man in ...
Dido

Dido  

In the Aeneid, the queen and founder of Carthage, who fell in love with the shipwrecked Aeneas and killed herself when he deserted her.
Diodorus Siculus

Diodorus Siculus  

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[Na]Greek historian who wrote a book called World history sometime between 60 bc and 30 bc. This account included descriptions of the Celts and the Gauls which were largely based on descriptions ...
Dionysius I

Dionysius I  

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Of Syracuse, born c.430 bc, son of Hermocritus, a well-to-do Syracusan; wounded (408) in Hermocrates' attempted coup; secretary to the generals (406), he distinguished himself in the campaign against ...
Fabius Pictor, Quintus

Fabius Pictor, Quintus  

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The first Roman historian. He wrote in Greek. A member of the senate, he went on an embassy to Delphi in 216 bc. His reasons for writing in Greek were both literary—the possibility of writing in ...
geography

geography  

The study of the Earth's surface and of the ways in which people, plants, and animals live on and use it.
Greek biography

Greek biography  

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Biography in antiquity was not a rigidly defined genre. Bios, ‘life’, or bioi, ‘lives’, spanned a range of types of writing. So the boundaries with neighbouring genres—the encomium, the biographical ...
Greek historiography

Greek historiography  

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Homer is slippery ground for the historian. But his characters show awareness of the past, and they long to leave glory behind them; thus Achilles sings of the famous deeds of men and Helen weaves ...
Hercynian Forest

Hercynian Forest  

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Properly the wooded heights of Thuringia and Bohemia. Originally put near the Pyrenees (scholiast on Dionysius Periegeta 286) or among the Celts (scholiast Apollonius Rhodius 4. 640) near the ...
Lycophron

Lycophron  

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The name of Lycophron is associated with two writers of the Hellenistic age, the identity of whom is open to much debate. They are here distinguished as (a) Lycophron and (b) ps.-Lycophron.(a) ...
Lycus

Lycus  

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Of Rhegium, Greek ethnographer and historian, adoptive father of the tragedian Lycophron (2a) and arch-enemy of Demetrius (3) of Phaleron (Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 570 T 1). He lived in ...
Olympiad

Olympiad  

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Four-year period between occurrences of the Olympian Games; see Hippias (2); Timaeus (2); time-reckoning. See also D. M. Lewis, Notes and Queries 1960, 403.
penates

penates  

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In ancient Rome, household gods worshipped in conjunction with Vesta and the lares; the name comes from Latin penus ‘provision of food’, related to penes ‘within’.
Philiscus

Philiscus  

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(4th cent. bc),a pupil of Isocrates, wrote a Rhetoric (τέχνη), a life of the orator Lycurgus (3), and political pamphlets. See Timaeus (2).Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 337bis (addenda ...
Philistus

Philistus  

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Of Syracuse, c.430–356 bc, friend, adviser, officer, and historian of Dionysius 1 I and 2 II. He helped Dionysius I seize power in 406/5 and served for a long time as commander of the tyrant's ...
Polybius

Polybius  

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(c. 200–c. 118bc),Greek historian. After an early political career in Greece he was deported to Rome. His forty books of Histories (only partially extant) chronicled the rise of the Roman Empire from ...

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