Update

Overview

tendon

Return to overview »

You are looking at 1-20 of 28 entries

  • Type: Overview Page x
clear all

View:

Achilles tendon

Achilles tendon  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The tendon of the muscles of the calf of the leg (the gastrocnemius and soleus muscles), situated at the back of the ankle and attached to the calcaneus (heel bone).
aponeurosis

aponeurosis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
n. a thin but strong fibrous sheet of tissue that replaces a tendon in muscles that are flat and sheetlike and have a wide area of attachment (e.g. to bones). —aponeurotic adj.
Belfast regime

Belfast regime  

Reference type:
Overview Page
• A regime of early active mobilization after flexor tendon repair.• A dorsal splint is worn, which leaves the fingers free to flex.• The wrist is held between neutral and ...
collagen

collagen  

Reference type:
Overview Page
n. a protein that is the principal constituent of white fibrous connective tissue (as occurs in tendons). Collagen is also found in skin, bone, cartilage, and ligaments. It is relatively inelastic ...
connective tissue

connective tissue  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The tissue that supports, binds, or separates more specialized tissues and organs or functions as a packing tissue of the body. It consists of an amorphous ground substance of mucopolysaccharides in ...
elbow

elbow  

The structures in and around the joint formed between the humerus of the upper arm and the ulna and radius of the forearm (see elbow joint).
forearm tenosynovitis

forearm tenosynovitis  

An inflammation of the tendon sheath of any tendon in the forearm that extends into the hand. Forearm tenosynovitis affects the fingers and wrist. It is commonly caused by a blow or forceful, ...
gait

gait  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(gayt)a manner of walking. ataxic g. an unsteady uncoordinated walk due to disease of the sensory nerves or cerebellum. See ataxia. cerebellar g. a staggering walk due to disease of the cerebellum. ...
ganglion

ganglion  

Reference type:
Overview Page
n. ( pl. ganglia) 1. (in neurology) any structure containing a collection of nerve cell bodies and often also numbers of synapses. In the sympathetic nervous system chains of ganglia are found on ...
hamstring

hamstring  

Reference type:
Overview Page
n. any of the tendons at the back of the knee. They attach the hamstring muscles (the biceps femoris, semitendinosus, and semimembranosus) to their insertions in the tibia and fibula.
joint

joint  

Reference type:
Overview Page
n. the point at which two or more bones are connected. The opposing surfaces of the two bones are lined with cartilaginous, fibrous, or soft (synovial) tissue. The three main classes of joint are ...
ligament

ligament  

A resilient but flexible band of tissue (chiefly collagen) that holds two or more bones together at a movable joint. Ligaments restrain the movement of bones at a joint and are therefore important in ...
muscle

muscle  

Reference type:
Overview Page
n. a tissue whose cells have the ability to contract, producing movement or force (see illustration). Muscles possess mechanisms for converting energy derived from chemical reactions into mechanical ...
muscle tendon unit

muscle tendon unit  

The unit which generates force production during athletic movements. The force is produced by a combination of muscle actions and a release of elastic energy from the tendon component. A muscle ...
musculoskeletal attachments

musculoskeletal attachments  

Structures that attach muscle to bone and bone to bone. See also ligament, tendon.
plantaris

plantaris  

A small, weak muscle at the back of the lower leg. It varies in size and may even be absent. It has its origin on the distal, posterior femur and its insertion on the tuberosity of the calcaneus via ...
sensation

sensation  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
As conventionally distinguished from perception, sensation is the initial physiological process of detecting an immediate external sensory stimulus prior to its interpretation and categorization. ...
skeletal muscle

skeletal muscle  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Striated muscle that is under voluntary control. The muscle fibres are a syncytium formed by myoblast fusion during development and contain the myofibrils which have tandem arrays of sarcomeres.
somatic sense

somatic sense  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Sense that enables people to feel pain, temperature change, touch. pressure, and the body's position in space.
strength training

strength training  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Specificity of trainingThe adaptation of muscles, and indeed body systems generally, to tasks with which they are repeatedly challenged, is highly specific. Thus training for endurance, for ...

View: