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barnacle

barnacle  

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A small crustacean that occurs in vast numbers attached to rocks, jetties, piers, etc., and on the hulls of ships and boats. The commonest on the shore are acorn barnacles (Balanus spp.), which live ...
bridge

bridge  

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An elevated platform built above the upper deck of a powered vessel, from which a ship is normally navigated and from where all activities on deck can be seen and controlled by the captain or officer ...
bulbous bow

bulbous bow  

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A rounded underwater projection forward of the ship's stem, which has been fitted on most seagoing ships, from cruise liners to tankers to fishing boats, since the 1960s. The object of the bulbous ...
bulk carrier

bulk carrier  

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A generic term for a vessel which carries large quantities of any material in bulk, but is now generally used to describe a large merchant vessel developed during the 1950s to transport large volumes ...
cofferdam

cofferdam  

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1 A temporary structure in the form of an enclosed dam which can be erected on the seabed or the bed of a river and pumped dry to enable men to work within it below water level without having to wear ...
diesel oil

diesel oil  

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Petroleum fuel used in heavy traction engines for trucks and buses, often incompletely combusted and a source of emission products that are an important component of urban smog.
double bottom

double bottom  

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A chartist's or technical analysis pattern where there are two lows to the price series. The low points suggest support at that price level. The opposite is known as a double top. See W pattern.[...]
electric propulsion

electric propulsion  

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Is basically the driving of a ship's propeller shaft by an electric motor, with the electric power for it being produced in one or more generators driven by steam propulsion, diesel engines using ...
environmental issues

environmental issues  

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Mankind has continually abused the sea, regarding it as an inexhaustible source of food and minerals, and a dumping ground for rubbish. Now it is more widely accepted that the oceans are finite, and ...
evaporators

evaporators  

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Are used at sea to produce distilled water from sea water. Though the Sirius was an exception, early steamships used sea water for boilers, but the salt scale caused loss of efficiency and the sea ...
flag of convenience

flag of convenience  

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Law
The national flag of a state flown by a ship that is registered in that state but is owned by a national of another state. A state whose law allows this practice can grant, in return for financial ...
International Maritime Organization

International Maritime Organization  

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(IMO),a special agency of the United Nations established in 1958 with responsibility for improving maritime safety and preventing pollution from ships. It has its headquarters on the Albert ...
jackstay

jackstay  

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A wire or hemp rope, or pendant, secured firmly between two points and used as a support. When refuelling at sea, the oil hosepipe is suspended on a jackstay between the tanker and the ship being ...
jetty

jetty  

Normally considered to be a solid structure built out, usually into the sea but in some cases along the shore as part of a port or dockyard alongside which ships could lie for loading or discharging ...
Lloyd's Register

Lloyd's Register  

A society formed (as Lloyd's Register of Shipping) in Lloyd's coffee house, London, in 1760 to inspect and classify all ocean-going vessels in excess of 100 tons. Ships are still periodically ...
load line

load line  

One of a series of lines marked on the hull of a ship to show the extent to which the hull may be immersed in the water. Originally introduced by Samuel Plimsoll MP in 1874 and running right round ...
MARPOL

MARPOL  

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The International Convention for the Prevention of Pollution from Ships, one of several conventions that are the responsibility of the International Maritime Organization (IMO). It incorporates the ...
master

master  

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Originally a rank in the Royal Navy during the days of sail as well as a rank in the merchant marine. The naval master was a specialist navigator and ship handler whose function was to manoeuvre his ...
ocean liners

ocean liners  

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May be defined as powered passenger-carrying vessels running a regular scheduled service across oceanic routes. Before the introduction of the jet passenger plane, it was the shipping lines, running ...
oceanographic Institutes

oceanographic Institutes  

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Oceanography is a multidisciplinary science that requires large and expensive facilities such as research ships, powerful computers, and the sophisticated instrumentation required for sampling and ...

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