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William Howard Taft

(1857—1930) American Republican statesman

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Adkins v. Children's Hospital

Adkins v. Children's Hospital  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
(1923).During the early twentieth century, Progressives sought to ameliorate the consequences of industrialization by enacting minimum wage laws. Conservatives and business groups challenged these ...
Administrative State

Administrative State  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
With deceptive simplicity the Constitution divides governmental power among three branches. Article I confers the legislative power on the Congress, composed of the Senate and House of ...
American Bar Association

American Bar Association  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The American Bar Association (ABA) was founded in 1878 in Saratoga Springs, New York, as a voluntary, national organization of the legal profession. Its initial membership totaled 289 lawyers, and ...
Andrew Jackson

Andrew Jackson  

(1767–1845)US general and Democratic statesman, 7th President of the USA (1829–37). After waging several campaigns against American Indians, he defeated a British army at New Orleans (1815) and ...
antitrust

antitrust  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
This is the American term for competition law. The basic provision of US antitrust is the Sherman Act of 1890. Section 1 states: ‘Every contract, combination in the form of ...
Architecture of the Supreme Court Building

Architecture of the Supreme Court Building  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Chief Justice William Howard Taft liked to think of the Constitution as the “Ark of the Covenant,” and the judiciary as a priestly class guarding its sacred principles. When Taft ...
Bailey v. Drexel Furniture Co.

Bailey v. Drexel Furniture Co.  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
259 U.S. 20 (1922), argued 7–8 Mar. 1922, decided 15 May 1922 by vote of 8 to 1; Taft for the Court, Clarke, without opinion, in dissent. Immediately following the unexpected invalidation of the ...
Ballinger-Pinchot Controversy.

Ballinger-Pinchot Controversy.  

The main actors in this bitter Progressive Era dispute over the future of conservation policy during the presidency of William Howard Taft (1909–1913) were Secretary of the Interior Richard A. ...
Buildings, Supreme Court

Buildings, Supreme Court  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Until October 1935, when the Supreme Court moved into its own building, it had always shared space with other governing institutions. The Court held its first session in February 1790 ...
Bureaucratization of the Federal Judiciary

Bureaucratization of the Federal Judiciary  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The Judiciary Act of 1789, which gave birth to the federal courts, created a simple three‐tiered judicial system staffed by six Supreme Court justices and thirteen district court judges. Over ...
Business of the Court

Business of the Court  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The business of the Supreme Court has changed substantially over its history, both causing and reflecting broad socioeconomic and political changes. Major shifts in the amount and nature of the ...
Carroll v. United States

Carroll v. United States  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
• 267 U.S. 132 (1925)• Vote: 6–2• For the Court: Taft• Dissenting: McReynolds and SutherlandIn 1923, George Carroll and John Kiro were transporting alcoholic beverages in an automobile. Federal ...
Charles Evans Hughes

Charles Evans Hughes  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
(b. Glen Falls, New York, 11 Apr. 1862; d. Osterville, Massachusetts, 27 Aug. 1948)US; Governor of New York 1906–10, Republican presidential candidate 1916 Hughes, the son of a Baptist preacher, was ...
chief justice

chief justice  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
The chief justice of the United States is the presiding officer of the Supreme Court and the head of the judicial branch of the federal government. The title chief justice ...
Clark Distilling Co. v. Western Maryland Railway Co.

Clark Distilling Co. v. Western Maryland Railway Co.  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
242 U.S. 311 (1917), argued 10–11 May 1915, ordered for reargument 1 Nov. 1915, reargued 8–9 Nov. 1916, decided 8 Jan. 1917 by vote of 7 to 2; White for the Court, Holmes and Van Devanter in dissent. ...
clerks of the Justices

clerks of the Justices  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Each Supreme Court justice may have a staff of four law clerks. Chief Justice William Rehnquist and Justice John Paul Stevens, however, chose to employ only three each. The justices ...
Constitutional Interpretation

Constitutional Interpretation  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Constitutional interpretation is both the process by which the American Constitution is construed and the study of that process. The latter is principally an academic activity while the former art ...
Disability of Justices

Disability of Justices  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Holding office during “good behavior” (Art. III, sec. 1), physically and/or mentally disabled justices are not deemed to be removable by impeachment. Nor are they subject to a constitutional ...
dissent

dissent  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
A judgment in a case on appeal, delivered by one or more judges, which reaches a different outcome from the majority of judges on the same case. A feature of ...
dollar diplomacy

dollar diplomacy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A term used to describe foreign policies designed to subserve US business interests. It was first applied to the policy of President Taft, whereby investments and loans, supported and secured by ...

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