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tackle

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advantage

advantage  

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The term used to describe the method used to reeve a tackle in order to gain the maximum increase in power. The power increase in a tackle is equal, if friction is disregarded, to the number of parts ...
backstay

backstay  

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A part of the standing rigging of a sailing vessel to support the upper part of a mast from aft, while forestays support it from forward. In square-rigged sailing ships, backstays are taken from the ...
bee blocks

bee blocks  

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Wooden swells on each side of the after end of a boom of a small vessel such as an old-fashioned smack or yacht. It has sheaves through which the leech reef pendants, or reefing tackle, were led.
block

block  

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A wooden or metal case into which one or more sheaves are fitted. They are used for various purposes in a ship or yacht, either as part of a purchase to increase the mechanical power applied to ...
bunt

bunt  

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The middle section of a square sail where it was cut full to form a belly. It applied more especially to topsails than to lower sails which were generally cut square with only a small allowance for ...
careen

careen  

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Kǝˈrēnv.1 turn (a ship) on its side for cleaning, caulking, or repair.2 (of a ship) tilt; lean over: a heavy flood tide caused my vessel to careen dizzily.[...]
carous

carous  

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A sort of gallery or bridge, pivoted in the centre and fitted in ancient warships, such as galleys, as a means of boarding an enemy. On forcing a way alongside an enemy it was hoisted up by a tackle ...
catspaw

catspaw  

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1 A twisting hitch made in the bight of a rope to form two eyes, through which the hook of a tackle is passed for hoisting purposes.2 The name given to a ruffle on the water indicating a breath of ...
chock-a-block

chock-a-block  

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The position when two blocks of a tackle come together so that no further movement is possible. It is also known as ‘two blocks’.
clew lines

clew lines  

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The lines or tackles used in square-rigged ships to haul the clews of the square sails up to their yards. Those used for the courses are often in the form of tackles and are called clew garnets.Colin ...
clip-hooks

clip-hooks  

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Two hooks of similar shape facing in opposite directions and attached to the same thimble. They have a flat inner side so that they can lie together to form an eye and are much used in small tackles ...
cringle

cringle  

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A short piece of rope worked grommet fashion into the bolt-rope of a sail and containing a metal thimble. In the days of sail they were used to hook in the tack and sheet tackles when they had to be ...
davit

davit  

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Small cranes from which a ship's boats are slung. The old-fashioned radial davits were manoeuvrable by twisting in their base sockets so that, when the boats were hoisted with blocks and tackles, ...
diving

diving  

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A method of marine fishing in which some species (such as octopus, sea urchins, and sea cucumbers) are handpicked by divers, brought to the surface, placed in boats, and taken ashore for processing.
fall

fall  

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The handling end of a tackle, the end of the rope, rove through blocks, on which the pull is exerted in order to achieve power. When used in the plural the term refers to the complete tackles by ...
fid

fid  

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1 A square bar of wood or iron, with a wider shoulder at one end, which in large sailing ships took the weight of a topmast when attached to a lower mast. The topmast was hoisted up through a guide ...
fiddle block

fiddle block  

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A double block in which the two sheaves lie in one plane one below the other instead of being mounted on the same central pin as in more normal double blocks. The upper sheave is larger than the ...
fleet

fleet  

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1 A company of vessels sailing together. This use of the word is also used to describe the whole of a national navy or all the ships owned by a shipping company.2 A creek or ditch which is tidal.3 As ...
garnet

garnet  

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A tackle used in a square-rigged ship for hoisting in casks and provisions. It was rigged from a guy or pendant made fast to the mainmast head with a block seized to the mainstay over the hatchway. ...
gun tackle

gun tackle  

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A tackle comprising a rope rove through two single blocks with the standing part of the rope made fast to the strop of one of the blocks. It multiplies the power exerted on the fall of the tackle by ...

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