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Synesius

(c. 370—413)

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alchemy

alchemy  

The medieval forerunner of chemistry, concerned with the transmutation of matter, in particular with attempts to convert base metals into gold or find a universal elixir.The term comes (in late ...
Anacreontics

Anacreontics  

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Literature
[ă‐nayk‐ri‐on‐tiks]Verses resembling, either metrically or in subject matter, those of the Greek poet Anacreon (6th century bce) or of his later imitators in the collection known as the Anacreontea. ...
astrolabe

astrolabe  

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History
An instrument used to make astronomical measurements, typically of the altitudes of celestial bodies, and in navigation for calculating latitude, before the development of the sextant. In its basic ...
Berenice

Berenice  

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The name of several Ptolemaic dynastic foundations. Among the best known are:(a) Berenice (mod. Benghazi), the westernmost Cyrenaican city, founded in the mid-3rd cent. bc (exact date and ...
Cyrenaica

Cyrenaica  

(Κυρήνη). The Roman province of Cyrenaica comprised the plateau of Djebel Akhdar on the east coast of Libya. Under Diocletian it was divided into two provinces: Libya Superior or Pentapolis ...
Cyrene

Cyrene  

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An ancient Greek city in North Africa, near the coast in Cyrenaica, which from the 4th century bc was a great intellectual centre, with a noted medical school.See also Simon of Cyrene.
Dionysius Petavius

Dionysius Petavius  

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Religion
(1583–1652), Denis Pétau, Jesuit historian and theologian. His Opus de Doctrina Temporum (1627) was a fundamental contribution to the study of ancient chronology. He also issued notable editions of ...
Epistolography

Epistolography  

Or the art of writing letters, a genre of Byz. literature akin to rhetoric, popular with the intellectual elite. Copious examples survive from all periods, in more than 150 published ...
foreigners

foreigners  

(ξένοι, also ethnikoi) were equated in the late Roman Empire with barbarians since it was assumed that the empire encompassed the entire civilized world, the oikoumene. Foreigners were either direct ...
Goths

Goths  

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History
Germanic tribes that overran the Western Roman empire. Originally from the Baltic area, by the 3rd century ad they had migrated to the northern Black Sea and the Lower Danube. The eastern group on ...
hymn

hymn  

A religious song or poem, typically of praise to God or a god. Recorded from Old English, the word comes via Latin from Greek humnos ‘ode or song in praise of a god or hero’, used in the Septuagint ...
Hypatia

Hypatia  

(c. 370–415),Greek philosopher, astronomer, and mathematician. Head of the Neoplatonist school at Alexandria, she wrote several learned treatises as well as devising inventions such as an astrolabe. ...
Kamariotes, Matthew

Kamariotes, Matthew  

Writer, scribe, and teacher; born Thessalonike, died Constantinople 1490. Kamariotes (Καμαριώτης) came to Constantinople during the final years of the Palaiologan dynasty and studied with Gennadios ...
metre

metre  

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Literature
Term used of regular succession of rhythmical impulses, or beats, in poetry and mus., e.g. 3/4 and 6/8 being described as different kinds of metres. Rhythm is no longer accepted as a sufficiently ...
Mirrors of Princes

Mirrors of Princes  

The writings known as Mirrors of Princes correspond to a whole series of didactic works usually intended for Kings or future kings, to whom they set out a teaching on ...
Pentapolis

Pentapolis  

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(African), the five Greek cities of central Roman Cyrenaica (the northern Gebel Akhdar and its coastal fringe), Cyrene (Shahat), with (from east to west) Apollonia or Sozusa in late antiquity ...
Poetry, Ecclesiastical

Poetry, Ecclesiastical  

Verse used during the liturgy or in religious contexts. Much of the liturgy in the Orthodox church consists of hymns; some are brief, such as stichera and troparia, meditations inserted ...
Stephanus

Stephanus  

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Religion
A family of scholar-printers.Robert Estienne (1503–59), Printer to Francis I, King of France, is famous for his Thesaurus Linguae Latinae (1532) and for his editions of the Bible, including the OT in ...
Theophilus

Theophilus  

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Religion
(d. 412), Patr. of Alexandria from 385. In the early years of his patriarchate he took an active part in suppressing the remnants of paganism in the city. Originally a supporter of Origenism, he ...
Thomas Magister

Thomas Magister  

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(Theodulos in religion) of Thessalonica was the secretary of the Byzantine emperor Andronicus II (ad 1282–1328), but withdrew to a monastery, where he devoted himself to scholarship.Works1. Ecloga ...

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