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stroke

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arm

arm  

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In type design, the horizontal stroke in E, F, or L. The horizontals of e, A, and H are called ‘bars’. See also cross-stroke.
bracketed

bracketed  

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In type design, a join between two elements (e.g. stem (see stroke) and serif) that uses a concave curve, rather than a stark right angle.
cross-stroke

cross-stroke  

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In type design, the horizontal stroke that crosses a vertical stroke on certain letters, such as t or f. A cross-stroke should have at least one end open (not joined ...
digital type design

digital type design  

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The process of designing or adapting typefaces for use with photocomposing machines or imagesetters using digital or numerical founts. The designers of some early digital typefaces (M. Carter with ...
fat face

fat face  

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An early 19th-century display face developed by considerably exaggerating the stroke contrast of vertically biased modern-face types.
hairline

hairline  

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Used to describe the thinnest of strokes in a letter, especially applied to serifs. A hairline serif can be bracketed or unbracketed.
Hebrew type

Hebrew type  

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Hebrew type’s three main styles derive from Hebrew MSS: the Sephardi, the Ashkenazi, and the Italian style (Sephardic Jews (Heb. Sepharad) originate in the Iberian peninsula; Ashkenazic Jews (Heb. ...
italic

italic  

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Of the sloping kind of typeface used especially for emphasis or distinction and in foreign words; (of handwriting) modelled on 16th-century Italian handwriting, typically cursive and sloping and with ...
legal script

legal script  

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A form of handwriting developed by writers of legal and other administrative documents. Its principal characteristics derive from the need to produce documents quickly, accurately, and economically. ...
ligature

ligature  

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Deriving from a form of the Latin ligare (‘to bind’), the term ‘ligature’ in palaeography means a stroke connecting two letters: for instance, the raised curve or loop which may ...
modern face type

modern face type  

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The English name for a new fashion in printing type that developed at the end of the 18th century. The serifs are horizontal and there is an increased contrast between ...
old face type

old face type  

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Type with the sloping serifs and the oblique stress of the thick and thin strokes, characteristic of the roman type made for Aldus, French 16th-century copies of it, and derivatives from these (e.g. ...
secretary hand

secretary hand  

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A style of handwriting used chiefly in legal documents from the 15th to the 17th centuries.
serif

serif  

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A font family of typefaces in which the main strokes have terminal strokes (serifs), normally at the top and bottom. The four main types of serif are bracketed (e.g. Times New Roman), hairline (e.g. ...
steel pen

steel pen  

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The use of various types of metal pens is recorded from ancient times, with notable developments occurring from at least the mid-sixteenth century onwards. However, what is most generally known ...
stress

stress  

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In typeface classification, the directional tendency of stroke contrast; derived from lettering made using a wedge-shaped writing tool held at varying angles.
stroke

stroke   Reference library

The Oxford Companion to the Book

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
25 words

A line forming part of a hand-rendered or printed character. The ratio of thickness of vertical to horizontal strokes

stroke

stroke   Reference library

A Dictionary of English Manuscript Terminology 1450–2000

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Literature, History
Length:
146 words

In palaeography, a stroke is a line in the formation of a letter made by a single movement of the

terminal

terminal  

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In type design, the end of a stroke (excluding serifs), which may be pointed, hooked, bulbous, dotted, or swash, etc.

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