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stoneware

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bellarmine

bellarmine  

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A stoneware jug with beard mask incised below the neck of the vessel, made in the Rhineland from the 16th century onwards. It was named after Cardinal Bellarmine (1542–1621), a zealous supporter of ...
black basalt

black basalt  

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A hard, black unglazed stoneware created by Josiah Wedgwood by 1769, used for busts, medallions, and vases, often with the addition of engine-turned decoration.
celadon

celadon  

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European term for a type of Chinese stoneware also known as greenware; the name derives from the colour of the dress worn by the shepherd Céladon in the stage version ...
ceramics

ceramics  

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[from the Greek keramos, ‘potter's earth’]A clay-based product, usually divided into pottery (such as earthenware, stoneware, and faience) and porcelain (soft-paste, hard-paste, and bone china).
Doultonware

Doultonware  

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High-fired vitrified non-porous salt-glazed ceramic made of a hard grey-brown material (stoneware) on which designs were drawn, a part or the whole then being richly coloured. Produced in the Doulton ...
earthenware

earthenware  

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Baked clay, used primarily for pottery, sometimes for sculpture, which is fired at a relatively low temperature. It remains porous until it is glazed. Creamware, maiolica, faience, and pearlware are ...
firing

firing  

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The process of heating a ceramic body in a kiln to harden it, fuse the components, and to melt the applied glaze so that it vitrifies to the surface. It can take several firings at different ...
glaze

glaze  

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A transparent or semi-transparent layer of paint applied over another layer so as to modify its colour; the light passing through is reflected back by the under surface and altered by the glaze. The ...
glaze

glaze  

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[Ma]A transparent or semi‐transparent vitreous or glassy layer fused on to the surface of a pot. This term is not correctly used to describe any other type of shiny surface.
ironstone

ironstone  

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An opaque and heavy glazed stoneware, patented by the Masons' factory in Staffordshire in 1813. Stronger and more durable than porcelain or earthenware, it was used for dinner services and large ...
Jan Emens Mennicken

Jan Emens Mennicken  

(b ?Raeren, fl1568–94; d ?Raeren).Belgian potter. He was the most important potter and producer of stoneware at Raeren during the period 1568 to 1594. Mennicken manufactured schnellen (tall, tapering ...
jasperware

jasperware  

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A fine-grained stoneware perfected by Josiah Wedgwood in 1775. Pure white, it was stained with colour, blue being the most popular. The earliest pieces were made in solid jasper, in which the colour ...
Korean pottery and porcelain

Korean pottery and porcelain  

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Although strongly influenced by Chinese styles, the ceramics produced in Korea have their own individual characteristics. The earliest pottery, a hard grey stoneware, dates from the 1st century bc. ...
Meissen

Meissen  

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Fine hard-paste porcelain produced in Meissen, a city in Saxony, eastern Germany, since 1710, in Britain often called Dresden china. The name may be used allusively for the type of a woman whose ...
Murabba῾at, Wadi

Murabba῾at, Wadi  

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Subject:
Religion
[This entry is divided into two articles: Archaeology and Written Material.]The caves of Wadi Murabba῾at lie in a deep ravine descending from the Judean Desert to the Dead Sea ...
New Forest pottery

New Forest pottery  

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Subject:
Archaeology
[Ar]Type of Roman pottery made in the New Forest area of southern England in the 3rd and 4th centuries ad. The most distinctive fabric is very hard, almost a stoneware, in a purple colour‐coat with a ...
posset pot

posset pot  

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A vessel for posset (hot milk curdled with ale or wine and seasoned with spices). They were made in England in the 17th and 18th centuries of slipware, stoneware, tin-glazed earthenware, or glass.
pottery

pottery  

[Ma]Clay that has been fashioned into a desired shape and then dried to reduce its water content before being fired or baked to fix its form. At temperatures of about 400 °C water begins to be lost ...
rosso antico

rosso antico  

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Italian term (‘ancient red’) for a red marble quarried in classical antiquity. The term was used in 1776 by Josiah Wedgwood to denote an unglazed red stoneware that had for ...
salt glaze

salt glaze  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
A type of glaze used on stoneware. Common salt was thrown into the kiln when it reached its maximum temperature. The salt combined with silicates in the clay to produce a thin, glazed surface with ...

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