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André Beauneveu

André Beauneveu  

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Overview Page
(b Valenciennes, c.1330/40; d ?Bourges, c.1403).Franco-Netherlandish artist, primarily a sculptor but also active as an illuminator and a designer of stained glass. He was born in Valenciennes and is ...
annals and chronicles: France—Grandes Chroniques de France

annals and chronicles: France—Grandes Chroniques de France  

The official history of France, principally compiled in both Latin and French at the abbey of St-Denis until the end of the 15th century.CDTB. Guenée, ‘Les Grandes chroniques ...
Argenteuil

Argenteuil  

A 7th-century women’s abbey near Versailles, developed under Carolingian patronage. Few records survive, none for the century before Heloise was a lay student there c.1115. After Abelard’s castration ...
art and architecture: Carolingian

art and architecture: Carolingian  

Literally, art and architecture produced in areas ruled by a monarch of the Carolingian dynasty. Geographically, while borders were somewhat fluid, this usually included western Germany, the Low ...
art and architecture: Cistercian

art and architecture: Cistercian  

The Cistercian order was founded in 1098 at Cîteaux, in Burgundy, by a group of monks who had left a reformed but traditional Benedictine monastery in hope of living a ...
art and architecture: Gothic

art and architecture: Gothic  

With the advent of the Gothic style, architecture became a leading form of artistic expression during the late MA. Despite regional peculiarities it shared a common language of forms and ...
art and architecture: Romanesque

art and architecture: Romanesque  

Term describing art produced in Europe between roughly 1000 and 1200.1. Definition2. Architecture3. Monumental decoration4. Portable arts5. Secular and military works6. Artists and aesthetics1. ...
Bertrand Du Guesclin

Bertrand Du Guesclin  

(c.1320–80)Born in Brittany, he fought for Charles of Blois in the Breton war of succession but was defeated at the battle of Auray (1364). He also served the French ...
Brogne

Brogne  

A Benedictine abbey founded in 919 by the nobleman Gerard who gave it his patrimonial possessions and introduced monks and Relics into it from Saint-Denis in France, the abbey of ...
Cardinal de Retz

Cardinal de Retz  

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Literature
(1613–79), Abp. of Paris. He was forced into an ecclesiastical career by his family, who had held the see of Paris since 1570. In 1643 he was appointed Coadjutor-Abp. of Paris to his uncle and in ...
Carolingian schools

Carolingian schools  

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Religion
In the reign of Charlemagne (768–814) there was an intellectual renaissance which established the basis for the school curriculum and education throughout the Middle Ages. Charlemagne himself, ...
Carolingians

Carolingians  

The Carolingian family left its direct mark on history from the early 7th c. until 987. In a first stage, it had acquired the political responsibilities that gradually made it ...
Charles Martel

Charles Martel  

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(c. 688–741)(French, martel, ‘hammer’) Frankish leader. He was the son of Pepin II, ‘mayor of the palace’ under Merovingian rule. He gained control of the Austrasian province and defeated the ...
Chartres

Chartres  

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Religion
A city in northern France, noted for its Gothic cathedral with fine stained glass.
Church and Synagogue

Church and Synagogue  

On either side of the crucifixion, medieval image-makers loved to set, to the right a woman with crown and Nimbus, brandishing the standard of victory and collecting Christ's blood in ...
Corvey

Corvey  

(monastery) Founded c.820 by monks from Corbie in Francia, Corvey became one of Saxony’s great monasteries, a missionary, educational, and economic centre. Under the Ottonians its abbots became ...
crypt

crypt  

[Greek kryptē, ‘hidden’] An accessible space beneath the ground floor of a church. Most crypts are situated under the sanctuary and contain a focus of veneration, usually a saint’s tomb ...
Dagobert I

Dagobert I  

(605–39)Last of the great Merovingian kings, Dagobert ruled with his father, Chlotar II, from 622 and succeeded him in 629. Dagobert established his authority over the Frankish kingdoms, appointing ...
Dionysius the Pseudo-Areopagite

Dionysius the Pseudo-Areopagite  

(c.500), mystical theologian. The name given to the author of a body of theological writings to which the supporters of Severus, Patr. of Antioch, appealed in 533, attributing them to Dionysius (1) ...
Donation of Constantine

Donation of Constantine  

A famous medieval forgery, probably composed around the year 750. The Donation of Constantine claimed to record a gift from Emperor Constantine I (d. 337) to Pope Silvester I, made ...

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