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stadium

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athletics

athletics  

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Overview Page
GreekAt the core of Greek athletics was an individual's struggle to gain victory over an opponent; hence it included not only (as ‘athletics’ implies nowadays) track and field events but also boxing, ...
chariot racing

chariot racing  

A form of horse racing immensely popular in the ancient civilizations of Greece, Rome, and Byzantium, with some predecessors in the privileged cultures of earlier civilizations, such as in Syria, ...
circus

circus  

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In Roman times a place of exhibition for chariot racing and athletic and gladiatorial contests. In its modern sense it dates from the mid-18th century. Mainly itinerant, it is performed ...
Greek tragedy

Greek tragedy  

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Tragedy, one of the most influential literary forms that originated in Greece, is esp. associated with Athens in the 5th cent. bc. All but one of the surviving plays date from the 5th cent., but ...
hippodrome

hippodrome  

In ancient Greece or Rome, a course for chariot or horse races.
measure

measure  

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1 A quantity ascertained or ascertainable by measurement.2 A number assigned to a property of an entity according to well-defined rules, so as to describe or represent that property objectively.3 A ...
Olympia

Olympia  

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A plain in Greece, in the western Peloponnese. In ancient Greece it was the site of the chief sanctuary of the god Zeus, the place where the original Olympic Games were held. An Olympiad was a period ...
Olympic Games

Olympic Games  

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An ancient Greek festival with athletic, literary, and musical competitions held at Olympia every four years, traditionally from 776 bc until abolished by the Roman emperor Theodosius I in ad 393.In ...
sanctuary

sanctuary  

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1 Especially holy place within a church or temple2 Sacrarium, or part of a church in the vicinity of the high-altar.3 Chancel or presbytery.
Stadium

Stadium   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
949 words

Sports ground, usually uncovered, enclosed by seating or terraces for spectators. The Greek term stadion was probably introduced in the

Stadium

Stadium   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
1,769 words
Illustration(s):
1

The word stadion was likely introduced into the Greek language in the sixth century bce, and by the fifth

stadium

stadium   Quick reference

The Concise Oxford Dictionary of Archaeology (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2009
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
109 words

[MC]

An ancient Greek open‐air running track and sports ground, providing for spectators by raised earth banks. The stadium was

stadium

stadium   Reference library

Richard Allan Tomlinson

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
321 words

running track, about 200 m. long (the term also signifies a comparable unit of linear measurement i.e. a ‘stade’; see ...

Stadiums

Stadiums   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Archaeology in the Near East

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2011
Subject:
Archaeology, History
Length:
1,285 words

The stadium (Gk., stadion), a thoroughly Greek institution, was a unit of measure, 600 ancient feet in length (between 177

terrace

terrace  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
1 Embankment or prepared and levelled mass of earth in e.g. a garden.2 Any artificial or built level platform for promenading, with a vertical or sloping front or sides faced with masonry, turf, ...

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