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arsenals and navies

arsenals and navies  

An arsenal consisted of a yard for shipbuilding, a repair shop, a magazine for storing detached pieces and disarmed hulls, and a workshop for making armaments, as well as sails ...
ballistics, cannon, and gunnery

ballistics, cannon, and gunnery  

By the beginning of the 14th century Europeans had developed tube-shaped weapons, made in bronze or wrought iron, which used gunpowder to discharge missiles from them, bolts (initially) and then ...
Baltic Exchange

Baltic Exchange  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(UK).A commodities, freight-chartering, and maritime exchange engaged in bringing together available ships and cargoes. With the advent of air-freight and charters, the exchange has diversified into ...
barratry

barratry  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Any act committed wilfully by the master or crew of a ship to the detriment of its owner or charterer. Examples include scuttling the ship and embezzling the cargo. Illegal activities (e.g. carrying ...
battle of Sluys

battle of Sluys  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(24 June 1340)A naval battle in the Hundred Years War. A force of French, Genoese, and Castilian ships intercepted an English force but was defeated by massed archers. Both French commanders were ...
belfry

belfry  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A small canopy or shelter supported on wooden brackets and often highly decorated with carvings and gold leaf, which used in older ships to be built over the ship's bell.
Ben Finney

Ben Finney  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
(b. 1933),American anthropologist. Ben Rudolph Finney was born in San Diego, California, on October 1, 1933, to a naval aviator, Leon H. Finney, and a schoolteacher and nurse, Melba ...
boat

boat  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
There are not many references to boats in the OT since the Hebrews were not a seafaring people; indeed the sea had connotations of evil (Ps. 107: 26; cf. Rev. 21: 1). However, in the NT boats are ...
broadcasting, unauthorized

broadcasting, unauthorized  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
An offence under the international law of the sea where there is unauthorized broadcasting of radio or television to the general public from a ship on the high seas. The offence can be prosecuted by ...
building materials

building materials  

GreekIn its developed stages Greek architecture was based on the use of finely dressed stone masonry, mainly limestone. Where available, white marble was used for the finest structures. Transport ...
burglary

burglary  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.The offence, under the Theft Act 1968, of either: (A) entering a building, part of a building, ship, or inhabited vehicle (e.g. a caravan) as a trespasser (R v Collins [1973] QB 100) with the ...
camel

camel  

The camel can survive for long periods without food or drink, chiefly by using up the fat reserves in its hump; from this comes the name ship of the desert.Camels are the emblem of the 4th-century ...
capital ship

capital ship  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A term used in navies to denote the most important type of warship in the national fleet. For centuries throughout the era of sailing navies it was the ship of the line, but after the introduction of ...
carrack

carrack  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A large sailing ship developed in the 14th century that carried a combination of square and lateen sails, first on two and later on three masts. See also ships, seafaring, and navigation.[...]
castle

castle  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A fortified building for the defence of a town or district, doubling as the private residence of a baron in the Middle Ages. Although also called ‘castles’, Celtic hill-forts, Roman camps, and Saxon ...
Chinese immigrants

Chinese immigrants  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The Chinese population in Britain has grown from less than 5,000 in 1946 to about 250,000 in 1993, mostly as a result of immigration from Hong Kong. About 70,000 live ...
Cinque Ports

Cinque Ports  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A group of medieval ports in south-east England (originally five: Dover, Hastings, Hythe, Romney, and Sandwich; Rye and Winchelsea were added later) formerly allowed various trading privileges in ...
clearance

clearance  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The document giving permission to sail by the custom house in a port to the master of a vessel going foreign. It is given after inspection of the ship's registry, its crew list and articles, receipts ...
Cleves

Cleves  

After the death of the last Carolingian duke of Lower Lorraine in the early 11th century, various gentry moved into the area to make their fortunes, often administering imperial forests. ...
clocks

clocks  

The usual instrument for telling time in antiquity was the sundial. This employed the shadow of a pointer cast on a surface marked with lines indicating the seasonal hours (one seasonal hour was 1/12 ...

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