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Seleucids

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Aemilius Paullus, Lucius

Aemilius Paullus, Lucius  

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(RE 114 (?))became an augur in 192 bc and governed Further Spain as praetor in 191, with command prorogued for 190 and 189. A defeat in 190 was retrieved ...
Alexander Balas

Alexander Balas  

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(d. 145 bc),pretended (or bastard) son of Antiochus (4) IV, usurped the Seleucid throne after the defeat and death of Demetrius (4) I. He was a pawn of Pergamum ...
Antiochus III

Antiochus III  

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(‘the Great’) (c. 242–187 bc), second son of Seleucus (2) II, succeeded to the Seleucid throne as a young man, after the assassination of his elder brother, Seleucus (3) III. ...
Antiochus IV Epiphanes

Antiochus IV Epiphanes  

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(c.215–164bc), third son of Antiochus III the Great, became king in 175. He sought actively to reconsolidate the remaining huge Seleucid empire, from Cilicia and Syria eastwards, after the Peace of ...
Arsacids

Arsacids  

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The Iranian royal dynasty with its original centre in Parthia, ruling c.250 bc–ad 224; named after the tribal chieftain Arsacēs, who had invaded the former Seleucid satrapy of Parthia from the north ...
Babylon

Babylon  

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Religion
An ancient city in Mesopotamia, the capital of Babylonia in the 2nd millennium bc under Hammurabi. The city (of which only ruins now remain) lay on the Euphrates and was noted by Classical writers ...
Bactria

Bactria  

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An ancient country in central Asia, corresponding to the northern part of modern Afghanistan. Traditionally the home of Zoroaster, it was the seat of a powerful Indo-Greek kingdom in the 3rd and 2nd ...
battle of Magnesia

battle of Magnesia  

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The decisive battle of the war between Rome and the Seleucid Antiochus III was fought near Magnesia by Mt. Sipylus in Lydia, in 189 bc. The nominal Roman commander was Cornelius Scipio Asiagenes, ...
bilingualism

bilingualism  

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Widespread bilingualism at some level was characteristic of the ancient world. Latin and esp. Greek were the languages of culture and education (in the Roman empire, Latin was the language of law and ...
birthday

birthday  

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Among the Greeks the birthdays of several major Olympian deities (e.g. of Artemis on the sixth, Apollo on the seventh, and Poseidon on the eighth) were in early times assigned to days of the month ...
Bithynia

Bithynia  

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A territory in NW Asia Minor. Although much of the land is mountainous and covered with forest, the river Sangarius with its tributaries and the valleys that run back from the Propontis form fertile ...
Books of Maccabees

Books of Maccabees  

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Four Books, so called after the hero of the first two, Judas Maccabaeus, are found in some MSS of the Septuagint. The first three are included in the Canon of the E. Church, and the first two in that ...
Carrhae

Carrhae  

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(mod. Harran), a city of north Mesopotamia about 40 km. (25 mi.) south-west of Edessa, at the junction of important trade routes. This site is the Haran of the Oedipus ...
Caspian Sea

Caspian Sea  

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Named after the ancient Caspii who lived on its southwestern shores, the Caspian is the world’s largest inland body of water. Geographically it is a lake, but it is big ...
Central Asia

Central Asia  

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Landlocked region of the Asian land mass. Largely through its location, topography and hydrology, it has served for millennia as the carrier of human communications between the societies and ...
Cilicia

Cilicia  

A Roman province, in SE Asia Minor. Tarsus, birthplace of Paul (Acts 22: 3) was one of its towns. Paul twice passed through the area (Acts 15: 40–41 and 18: 23).
Colchis

Colchis  

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An ancient region south of the Caucasus mountains at the eastern end of the Black Sea. In classical mythology it was the goal of Jason's expedition for the Golden Fleece, and the home of Medea.
colonization, Hellenistic

colonization, Hellenistic  

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Plutarch, in his eulogy of Alexander 2 the Great, made the foundation of cities the linchpin of the achievement of Alexander, who wished to spread Greek civilization throughout his realm, and it is ...
Commagene

Commagene  

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Country on the west bank of the upper Euphrates, first known as the neo-Hittite kingdom of Kummuh with a capital of the same name at Samosata. Its history can be ...
Cornēlius Scīpiō Aemiliānus Africānus (Numantīnus), Publius

Cornēlius Scīpiō Aemiliānus Africānus (Numantīnus), Publius  

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B. 185/4 bc as second son of Aemilius Paullus (2), adopted as a child by Cornelius Scipio, son of Cornelius Scipio Africanus. In 168 he fought under Paullus at Pydna. Back in Rome, he met Polybius, ...

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