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sarcophagus

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acroterion

acroterion  

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[Co]The sculptured figure, tripod, disc, or urn, of bronze, marble, or terracotta, placed on the apex of the pediment of a Greek temple or other substantial building; sometimes also above the outer ...
alabaster

alabaster  

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A term applied to two types of soft, translucent stone that are similar in appearance but different in composition. The first, known variously as calcite alabaster, Egyptian alabaster, or onyx ...
Alexander Sarcophagus

Alexander Sarcophagus  

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A marble sarcophagus (c.310 bc, Archaeological Mus., Istanbul), shaped like a chest with a lid in the form of a temple roof, found in the royal cemetery at Sidon in ...
altar

altar  

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Religion
The table in a Christian church at which the bread and wine are consecrated in communion services; a table or flat-topped block used as the focus for a religious ritual, especially for making ...
André Beauneveu

André Beauneveu  

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(b Valenciennes, c.1330/40; d ?Bourges, c.1403).Franco-Netherlandish artist, primarily a sculptor but also active as an illuminator and a designer of stained glass. He was born in Valenciennes and is ...
arcosolium

arcosolium  

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Religion
(pl. arcosolia).Loculus with an arched or vaulted top in a Roman catacomb, hypogeum, or other type of tomb, usually big enough to contain a sarcophagus.
Arnolfo di Cambio

Arnolfo di Cambio  

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(b Colle di Val d'Elsa, nr. Siena, c.1240/5; d Florence, 1302/10).Italian sculptor and architect. He is first mentioned in 1265 as Nicola Pisano's assistant on the pulpit for Siena Cathedral. In 1277 ...
art and architecture: Seljuk

art and architecture: Seljuk  

Art and architecture produced during the Seljuk period is important in that it defined aesthetic and architectural expression in the central and eastern Islamic lands for the next several centuries. ...
art, funerary, Greek

art, funerary, Greek  

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Archaic period(c.700–c.480). The period's chief innovations were the funerary statue and carved gravestone. Kouroi (standing, usually nude, youths) marked graves on Thera by c.630. Funerary korai ...
art, funerary, Roman

art, funerary, Roman  

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Early republican tombs at Rome have none of the decorative features of contemporary Etruscan funerary art (see etruscans), but by the mid to late republic some aristocratic tombs show a desire for ...
battle-piece

battle-piece  

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A painting of a battle or military scene. The great Renaissance battle pictures of Leonardo (Battle of Anghiari 1503–6) and Michelangelo (Battle of Cascina c.1506) are now lost but are known through ...
burial

burial  

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Religion
For Hindus the normal means of corpse disposal is cremation; however, the bodies of children (who have not yet entered on the ritual life) and of saṃnyāsins and other ascetics (who are considered to ...
burial Customs.

burial Customs.  

(500–1500)The burial customs during the medieval period across Europe were, in broad terms, remarkably uniform, within and between the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish religions, although the details of ...
Carolingian

Carolingian  

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Term describing the style of architecture associated with the reign of Emperor Charlemagne (800–14). Carolingian architecture is generally accepted as dating from late C8 to early C10, and examples ...
Carrara

Carrara  

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A town in Tuscany in NW Italy, famous for the white marble quarried there since Roman times.
cassone

cassone  

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Italian term for a large, decorated chest, especially one that contained a bride's dowry or was given as a wedding present. They were popular from the 14th to the 16th century, and cassoni with ...
catacomb

catacomb  

[MC]An underground cemetery comprising a complex of passageways, burial niches, and recessed chambers cut into the living rock. Established during imperial times in Rome, the catacombs later came to ...
Christian archaeology

Christian archaeology  

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Religion
The phrase commonly denotes the study of the monuments, as distinct from the documents, of early Christianity for the light they can throw on the thought and religious life of the Church, especially ...
ciborium

ciborium  

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A canopy raised over the high altar, it is normally a dome supported on columns. The term comes from the lidded vessel on the altar in which the Sacrament was preserved. See baldacchino.

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