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rigging

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all-a-taunt-o

all-a-taunt-o  

Reference type:
Overview Page
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History
The condition of a square-rigged sailing vessel where all the running rigging is hauled taut and belayed, and all her yards are crossed on the masts, i.e. have not been sent down. In general it ...
anchor buoy

anchor buoy  

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History
A buoy used to mark the position of a ship's anchor when it is on the bottom. It is usually employed when anchoring on a rocky bottom. With small anchors, such as those used by yachts, the buoy's ...
backstay

backstay  

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Overview Page
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History
A part of the standing rigging of a sailing vessel to support the upper part of a mast from aft, while forestays support it from forward. In square-rigged sailing ships, backstays are taken from the ...
belay

belay  

Biˈlāv.1 fix (a running rope) around a cleat, pin, rock, or other object, to secure it.2 slang stop; enough!: “Belay that, mister. Man your post.”
belaying pin

belaying pin  

Short cylindrical lengths of wood, iron, or brass. They are held by fife rails or pinrails in convenient places in a sailing ship around which the running rigging can be belayed.
bitts

bitts  

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History
In the days of sail, a frame composed of two strong pillars of straight oak timber, fixed upright in the fore part of the ship and bolted to the deck beams. To them were secured the cables when the ...
boarders

boarders  

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History
Sailors appointed to board an enemy ship, or to repel such attempts by an enemy. In the British Navy during the days of sail four men from each gun's crew were generally designated as boarders. Their ...
boatswain's chair

boatswain's chair  

(bo'sun's chair) a short board, secured in a bridle, used to sway a man aloft for scraping and painting masts, and treating yards and rigging.
bobstay

bobstay  

Reference type:
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History
A chain or heavy wire rigging running from the end of the bowsprit to the ship's stem or cutwater. Particularly heavy rigging was required in this position since the fore-topmast in sailing vessels ...
bolster

bolster  

Reference type:
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History
A piece of wood fitted in various places in a ship, mostly wooden sailing vessels, to act as a preventive to chafe or nip. Powered ships sometimes have them fixed to the deck around the hawseholes to ...
bottlescrew

bottlescrew  

Reference type:
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History
A type of screw, not perfected until the 1870s, which is used to adjust any rigging equipment for length or tension, the correct maritime term being to ‘set up’ the rigging. It consists of an ...
bow-chaser

bow-chaser  

Reference type:
Overview Page
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History
A long gun mounted forward in the bow-ports of sailing men-of-war and positioned to fire directly ahead. They were sometimes mounted in pairs and were always of small bore in relation to their length ...
breast backstays

breast backstays  

Reference type:
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History
A pair of stays which led from the head of a topmast or a topgallant mast in a square-rigged ship to chain-plates forward of the standing backstays to provide support for the upper masts from the ...
carcass

carcass  

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History
An incendiary ship-to-ship weapon, used in the British Navy between the 17th and 19th centuries. It was an iron shell filled with a composition of saltpetre, sulphur, resin, turpentine, antimony, and ...
chain shot

chain shot  

Two cannon balls, connected together by either a chain or an iron bar, which when fired from a gun rotated at great speed through the air. It was designed to destroy the spars and rigging of an enemy ...
chainplate

chainplate  

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History
Strips of iron or bronze with their lower ends bolted to the ship's side under the chain-wales (see chains (2) ) of sailing vessels. They carry the deadeyes or rigging screws to which the standing ...
cheeks

cheeks  

Reference type:
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History
1 Pieces of timber bolted to the mast of a sailing ship below the masthead to support the trestle-trees. For illus. see rigging: standing rigging.2 The two sidepieces of the wooden gun carriages in ...
clothing

clothing  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The name by which the various pieces of rigging which hold a bowsprit in position are known. The comparable name in the case of masts is apparel.
cockbill

cockbill  

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History
1 An anchor is said to be cockbilled or a-cockbill when hung vertically by its ring stopper from a timberhead or cathead ready for use, or, temporarily, during the recovery process.2 Yards of a ...
Cutty Sark

Cutty Sark  

Reference type:
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Subject:
History
The only survivor of the British tea clippers, launched in 1869 and now preserved as a museum ship at Greenwich, London.The name comes from Robert Burns's Tam o' Shanter, a poem about a Scottish ...

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