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Aachen

Aachen  

(town, palace) West central German town, known for its hot springs. Aachen’s significance is linked to Charlemagne, who created a Carolingian palace complex there, where he was buried. Successive ...
Aimoin of St-Germain-des-Prés

Aimoin of St-Germain-des-Prés  

(d. 889) Monk and hagiographer.Aimoin entered the Benedictine monastery of St-Germain-des-Prés before 845; from 872 he was responsible for the house’s archive and scriptorium. His writings deal with ...
Alfonso V of Aragon

Alfonso V of Aragon  

(1396–1458)Eldest son of Fernando de Antequera (Fernando I, 1414–16) and Leonor of Albuquerque, Alfonso was a Castilian prince of the Trastámara family who acceded to the Crown of Aragon ...
altar

altar  

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Religion
The table in a Christian church at which the bread and wine are consecrated in communion services; a table or flat-topped block used as the focus for a religious ritual, especially for making ...
Amnos

Amnos  

(ἀμνóς, “lamb”), term that refers esp. to the sacrificial lamb. In the Old Testament the lamb was a common sacrificial victim, esp. the paschal lamb; in the New Testament and ...
Andrew of Longjumeau

Andrew of Longjumeau  

(13th c.)A Dominican missionary who, perhaps already instructed to bring the relics of the Passion to France (1239), brought letters from Innocent IV to various Muslim princes and oriental ...
antiminsion

antiminsion  

In the E. Church a silk or linen cloth, containing relics; it was originally intended for use when there was no consecrated altar, but it is now used like a W. corporal.
Antonines

Antonines  

The Hospitaller Order of St Anthony in Viennois (Isère) arose in c.1095. At this time there appeared in Europe a sickness called ignis sacer by reason of the burning pains ...
Antony

Antony  

(secular name Dobrynja Jadrejkovič), archbishop of Novgorod (1210–22, 1223, 1225–28); died 8 Oct. 1232.He authored a description of Constantinople, Kniga palomnik (The Pilgrim Book, ca.1200), and ...
Antony, St, of Padua

Antony, St, of Padua  

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Religion
(1188/95–1231), Franciscan friar. When he was 15 he joined the Augustinian Canons. He was deeply moved when the relics of some Franciscans killed in Morocco were brought to Coimbra in 1220; he ...
archaeology

archaeology  

The study of past human cultures through the analysis of material remains (as fossil relics, artefacts, and monuments), which are usually recovered through excavation.
architecture, Ecclesiastical

architecture, Ecclesiastical  

Ecclesiastical architecture responds, from a purely practical point of view, primarily to the requirements of worship and secondarily to the needs of those who dedicate themselves to the religious ...
art and architecture: Bulgarian

art and architecture: Bulgarian  

Over most of its history, the medieval Bulgarian state covered the territory of the modern republics of Bulgaria and Macedonia. While outstanding monuments of Byzantine art are found there in ...
art and architecture: early Christian

art and architecture: early Christian  

In its most common definition, the art and architecture of the Roman Empire from the 4th through the 6th century. Chronological boundaries tend to vary depending on preferences of periodization ...
art and architecture: Norman

art and architecture: Norman  

1. Historical context2. Architecture in France3. Architecture in England4. Normans in Sicily and southern Italy5. MS illumination1. Historical context2. Architecture in France3. Architecture in ...
art and architecture: Ottonian

art and architecture: Ottonian  

As befits a term derived from the political sphere, Ottonian art and architecture refers to those buildings and works of art produced in the Germanic lands (and surrounding areas) that ...
art and architecture: Romanesque

art and architecture: Romanesque  

Term describing art produced in Europe between roughly 1000 and 1200.1. Definition2. Architecture3. Monumental decoration4. Portable arts5. Secular and military works6. Artists and aesthetics1. ...
art, funerary, Greek

art, funerary, Greek  

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Archaic period(c.700–c.480). The period's chief innovations were the funerary statue and carved gravestone. Kouroi (standing, usually nude, youths) marked graves on Thera by c.630. Funerary korai ...
Athelstan

Athelstan  

(895–939),king of England 925–39. Athelstan came to the thrones of Wessex and Mercia in 924 before effectively becoming the first king of all England. He successfully invaded both Scotland and Wales ...
Athos

Athos  

100 kilometres south-east of Thessalonica, Athos forms the easternmost of the three peninsulas that prolong Chalcidike southwards, as well as the most mountainous and least accessible. It is a vast ...

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