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Overview

recklessness

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advert

advert  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Law
(Latin advertere, turn toward; same origin as advertise)To give attention to something; to direct one's own or another person's awareness toward it. Where knowledge is a mental element of ...
arson

arson  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.The intentional or reckless destruction or damaging of property by fire without a lawful excuse. There are two forms of arson corresponding to the two forms of criminal damage in the Criminal ...
assault

assault  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.An intentional or reckless act that causes someone to be put in fear of immediate physical harm. Actual physical contact is not necessary to constitute an assault (for example, pointing a gun at ...
basic intent

basic intent  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Any criminal offence for which recklessness or negligence will suffice to establish the * mens rea element may be considered an offence of basic intent. Compare specific intent. See also intoxication.
blameworthiness

blameworthiness  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Law
A state of being guilty or warranting condemnation or censure. The notion of blameworthiness captures the idea that a criminal conviction connotes a moral evaluation of the defendant's guilt as ...
conduct

conduct  

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Subject:
Law
(wrongful)Behaviour including both acts that are prohibited and attract legal consequences when done, and omissions, that is, failure to do something that is mandated (required) by law, which also ...
foresight

foresight  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.Awareness at the time of doing an act that a certain consequence may result. In the case of some crimes (e.g. wounding with intent) an intention by the accused to bring about a certain consequence ...
intention

intention  

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Subject:
Law
N.The state of mind of one who aims to bring about a particular consequence. Intention is one of the main forms of * mens rea, and for some crimes the only form (for example, murder). A person is ...
intoxication

intoxication  

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Subject:
Law
The state of being inebriated or poisoned by a drug or other substance taken into the body. intoxicant n. Anything that causes intoxication. [From Latin intoxicare to poison, from toxicum a ...
malice

malice  

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Subject:
Law
Bear malice the desire to harm someone, especially through a sense of personal injury.malice aforethought in law, the intention to kill or harm which is held to distinguish unlawful killing from ...
mens rea

mens rea  

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Subject:
Law
The subjective element for criminality, requires that a defendant have both a culpable state of mind (for instance, not be insane or coerced) and the particular mental state, such as ...
perjury

perjury  

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Subject:
Law
N.The offence of giving false evidence or evidence that one does not believe to be true (even if it is in fact the truth). It is punishable by up to seven years' imprisonment and/or a fine. The ...
specific intent

specific intent  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Law
Any offence for which only intention will suffice as the * mens rea element may be considered an offence of specific intent. Compare basic intent. See also intoxication.

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