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Ravenna

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Adriatic Sea

Adriatic Sea  

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(Gk. ὁ Ἀδρίας; Lat. Mare adriaticum or superum), used as an alternative to ‘Ionian Sea’ for the waters between the Balkan peninsula and Italy, and like ‘Ionian’, sometimes extended to ...
Agnellus

Agnellus  

Also called Andreas; 9th-C. priest and abbot of S. Maria ad Blachernas and St. Bartholomew's in Ravenna. He came from a leading family; his ancestor Ioannicius served in the central ...
Agnellus of Ravenna

Agnellus of Ravenna  

Iatrosophist and author, according to MS Milan, Ambr. G. 108 inf., of lectures on three introductory Galenic treatises (De sectis, Ars medica, De pulsibus ad tirones). Because of the colophon ...
Aistulf

Aistulf  

(died 756)Aistulf was proclaimed King of the Lombards (and reigned 749–756) at Milan, while Pavia was still held by his brother and predecessor Ratchis (744–749), who retired to Monte Cassino.[...]
Amphipolis

Amphipolis  

On the east bank of the Strӯmōn, which surrounds the city on three sides (hence its name), 5 km. (3 mi.) from its seaport Eïon; it was originally the site of a Thracian town, Ennea Hodoi (‘nine ...
Andreas Agnellus

Andreas Agnellus  

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(c.800–c.845), historian of Ravenna. His Liber Pontificalis Ecclesiae Ravennatis traces the history of the see from St Apollinaris to his own age. It embodies valuable information about contemporary ...
Andrew

Andrew  

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Brother of Simon Peter (Mark 1: 16), with whom he was fishing when invited by Jesus to become a disciple. But John 1: 35–41 offers an alternative account; Andrew followed Jesus after hearing John the ...
Annals of Ravenna

Annals of Ravenna  

Conventional title of a Latin chronicle (probably of the 6th C.) of which only half of an 11th-C. folio (MS 202) has survived in the library of the cathedral in ...
Anselm

Anselm  

Author, ambassador, bishop of Havelberg (1129–55), and archbishop of Ravenna (1155–58); born Germany? ca.1100, died Milan 12 Aug. 1158.In 1135/6 Anselm visited Constantinople as the ambassador of the ...
Appearances of Christ After the Passion

Appearances of Christ After the Passion  

Are variously reported in the Gospels, there being 11 different episodes in all. In pre-Iconoclastic art, only the Doubting of Thomas (Jn 20:24–29) and the Chairete (Christ's meeting with two ...
Apulia

Apulia  

In Roman times, Apulia covered the north of modern Puglia and the neighbouring areas: the south of the region was called Calabria, a name that shifted during the early Middle ...
Arator

Arator  

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(6th cent.), Christian Latin poet. He left the imperial service to become a subdeacon at Rome, where he was associated with Pope Vigilius. His De actibus apostolorum, a version of the Book of Acts in ...
architecture, Civil

architecture, Civil  

Civil architecture includes public buildings and private dwellings, but excludes military constructions and rural architecture. Important public buildings comprised essentially imperial and royal ...
art and architecture: early Christian

art and architecture: early Christian  

In its most common definition, the art and architecture of the Roman Empire from the 4th through the 6th century. Chronological boundaries tend to vary depending on preferences of periodization ...
Art and the West

Art and the West  

While the dedication of Constantinople as the new Rome symbolized imperial and artistic unity and Constantinople was patterned after old Rome in its topography and monuments, their shared traditions ...
autocephalous

autocephalous  

The term was used in the early Church of bishops who were under no superior authority and thus were independent of both Metropolitan and Patriarch, and of those directly dependent on the Patriarch ...
Auximum

Auximum  

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With well-preserved ancient walls, hill-town of Picenum, 17 km. (10 ½ mi.) from the Adriatic. Becoming a Roman colony (128 bc?), it developed into a flourishing place, which supported Caesar ...
baldachin

baldachin  

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A ceremonial canopy of stone, metal, or fabric over an altar, throne, or doorway. Recorded from the late 16th century (denoting a rich brocade of silk and gold thread) the word comes ultimately from ...
Belisarius

Belisarius  

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[Na]Roman general who campaigned against Persia in ad 527 and ad 540, captured Vandal Africa in ad 533–4, and began the reconquest of Ostrogothic Italy in ad 535. Died ad 565.
Boethius

Boethius  

(c. 480–524),Roman statesman and philosopher, best known for The Consolation of Philosophy, which he wrote while in prison on a charge of treason. He argued that the soul can attain happiness in ...

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