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Anytus

Anytus  

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A rich Athenian and democratic leader, best known as a prosecutor of Socrates (399 bc). General in 409, he failed to prevent the loss of Pylos; at his trial he reportedly bribed the entire jury. ...
Artemis

Artemis  

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In Greek mythology, a goddess, daughter of Zeus and sister of Apollo. She was a huntress and is typically depicted with a bow and arrows, and was also identified with Selene, goddess of the moon; her ...
botany

botany  

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The scientific study of plants, including their anatomy, morphology, physiology, biochemistry, taxonomy, cytology, genetics, ecology, evolution, and geographical distribution.
Brasidas

Brasidas  

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(d. 422 bc),Spartan commander. Following distinguished action as a trierarch at Pylos in 425, he was sent to northern Greece in 424 with a small force of helots and mercenaries. After saving Megara ...
Cleon

Cleon  

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Athenian politician, b. c.470 bc, the son of a rich tanner. He was perhaps involved in the attacks on Pericles through his intellectual friends in the 430s, and in the opposition to Pericles' ...
Codrus

Codrus  

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Supposedly king of Athens in the 11th cent. bc. According to the story current in the 5th cent. (Pherecydes Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 3 F 154; Hellanicus ibid. 4 F ...
Demetrius

Demetrius  

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(RE 44a (Suppl. 1),of Pharos surrendered Corcyra to Rome in 229 bc, during Rome's First Illyrian War. He was rewarded by being made dynast of part of Illyria, but ...
Demosthenes

Demosthenes  

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(d. 413 bc),Athenian general. After an unsuccessful invasion of Aetolia in 426 he won two brilliant victories against a Peloponnesian and Ambraciot army invading Amphilochia. In 425 his occupation of ...
dialects, Greek (prehistory)

dialects, Greek (prehistory)  

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In the first half of the first millennium bc each Greek region and indeed each Greek city spoke and sometimes wrote its own dialect (see Greek language). The Greeks themselves ...
Dionysus

Dionysus  

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In Greek mythology, a god, son of Zeus and Semele; his worship entered Greece from Thrace c.1000 bc. Originally a god of the fertility of nature, associated with wild and ecstatic religious rites, in ...
Elis

Elis  

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City of the Peloponnese of Greece, deserving immortal fame because, in honour of its native son Pyrrho, it passed a law exempting all philosophers from taxation.
fig

fig  

The fruit of Ficus carica; eaten fresh or dried. Figs have mild laxative properties (syrup of figs is a medicinal preparation). A 40‐g portion of dried figs (two figs) is a source of calcium, iron, ...
Hera

Hera  

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In Greek mythology, a powerful goddess, the wife and sister of Zeus and the daughter of Cronus and Rhea. She was worshipped as the queen of heaven and as a marriage goddess. Her Roman equivalent is ...
Hermes

Hermes  

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In Greek mythology, the son of Zeus and Maia, the messenger of the gods, and god of merchants, thieves, and oratory. He was portrayed as a herald equipped for travelling, with broad-brimmed hat, ...
Ithaca

Ithaca  

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An island off the western coast of Greece in the Ionian Sea, the legendary home of Odysseus.
linen

linen  

A textile woven from treated stalks of the flax plant. First known in ancient Egypt, the fabric was particularly good for lace and household textiles, the best being produced in Germany and the Low ...
measure

measure  

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1 A quantity ascertained or ascertainable by measurement.2 A number assigned to a property of an entity according to well-defined rules, so as to describe or represent that property objectively.3 A ...
megaron

megaron  

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1 Principal men's room or hall in an Ancient Greek house, or a room in a temple where only the priest could enter.2 Square or rectangular room often with a raised central hearth, and four columns ...
Messenia

Messenia  

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The SW region of Peloponnese, bounded on the north by Elis— and Arcadia, and on the east by Laconia. The Spartans had conquered central Messenia by (?) 700 bc, reducing the old population to the ...
Methone

Methone  

Or Mothone, strong place on the western peninsula of Messenia, south of Pylos. See Brasidas.

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