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ambiguity

ambiguity  

Having more than one meaning. The simplest case is lexical ambiguity, where a single term has two meanings. A sentence or grammatically complex construction can be ambiguous without any of the words ...
antanaclasis

antanaclasis  

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Overview Page
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Literature
A figure of speech that makes a pun or paronomasia by repeating the same word, or two words sounding alike (see homophone), but with differing senses.
asteismus

asteismus  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A rhetorical term for a facetious reply, usually involving a pun or pretended misunderstanding of a word used by the previous speaker. A common device of dramatic dialogue, especially in comedies, it ...
double entendre

double entendre  

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Overview Page
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Literature
[doo-blahn-tahndr]A French phrase for ‘double meaning’, adopted in English to denote a pun in which a word or phrase has a second, usually sexual, meaning, as in Elizabethan uses of the verb ‘die’ ...
equivoque

equivoque  

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Overview Page
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Literature
[ek-wi-vohk]A pun or deliberately ambiguous expression. Adjective: equivocal. Verb: equivocate. See also ambiguity, double entendre, paronomasia.
extravaganza

extravaganza  

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Music
(from It. ‘stravaganza’).A mus. work which intentionally caricatures conventional procedures, such as Mozart's Ein musikalische Spass (A Musical Joke), and especially a 19th‐cent. Eng. form of stage ...
homophone

homophone  

Words that have the same pronunciation but different spelling or meaning or both, such as write and right, threw and through, or rest (relaxation) and rest (remainder). Homophones are one of the two ...
paronomasia

paronomasia  

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Religion
A rhetorical device, especially in the OT, using two words similar in sound or appearance. It is difficult to reproduce this Hebrew play upon words, but one suggestion for the pun in Isa. 7: 9 is ‘If ...
portmanteau word

portmanteau word  

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Literature
A word blending the sounds and combining the meanings of two others, for example motel or brunch. The term was coined by Lewis Carroll in Through the Looking-glass (1872).
syllepsis

syllepsis  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A figure of speech by which a word, or a particular form or inflection of a word, is made to refer to two or more words in the same sentence, while properly applying to them in different senses: e.g. ...

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