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primary colour

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additive colour

additive colour  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
A process of generating colours by combining red, green, and blue light that is used in film, photography, stage-lighting, and graphic design. Mixing the primary colours of red and green produces the ...
additive primary

additive primary  

Any of the shades of red, green, or blue that can be mixed to form white and to match all other spectral colours and also certain non-spectral colours such as purple. Primary red, green, and blue are ...
anomalous dichromacy

anomalous dichromacy  

A form of colour-blindness caused by a defect in the functioning of one of the three visual pigments in the cones of the retina, leading to a form of colour vision in which only two of the three ...
anomalous trichromacy

anomalous trichromacy  

A form of colour-blindness in which the proportions of three primary colours (1) that are mixed to match a comparison colour deviate from the normal. Also called anomalous trichromasy, anomalous ...
camera

camera  

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Overview Page
1. Any equipment used to photographically record images. The name for a number of devices that use lenses and apertures to photograph either a single still image or a series of still images captured ...
chromaticity

chromaticity  

The quality of colour or light in terms of the purity of its dominant wavelength, involving both hue and saturation (1). The chromaticity coordinates of a colour are the three tristimulus values, ...
colorimeter

colorimeter  

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Overview Page
n. an instrument for determining the concentration of a particular compound in a preparation by comparing the intensity of colour in it with that in a standard preparation of known concentration. The ...
colour

colour  

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Overview Page
Created by the reactions of the human eye to certain properties possessed by an object when it reflects or emits light. More technically, colour is determined by ocular interpretation of ...
colour equation

colour equation  

A formula showing the proportions of three additive primary colours required by a viewer to match a specified stimulus colour, especially a formula based on the CIE colour system. US color equation. ...
colour photography

colour photography  

Any of various methods of forming coloured images on film or paper by photographic means. One common process is a subtractive reversal system that utilizes a film with three layers of light-sensitive ...
colour television

colour television  

A television system in which the camera filters the light from the scene into the three primary-colour components, red, blue, and green, detected by separate camera tubes. The separate information so ...
complementary colours

complementary colours  

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Overview Page
Any pair of colours that produce white or grey when mixed in the correct proportions. There is an infinite number of such complementary pairs, but the following typical examples can be read off the ...
deuteranomaly

deuteranomaly  

A form of partial colour-blindness in which the proportion of green light required to be mixed with red to match yellow is abnormally high according to the normal Rayleigh equation, owing to a ...
deuteranopia

deuteranopia  

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n. a defect in colour vision in which reds, yellows, and greens are confused. It is thought that the mechanisms for perceiving red light and green light are in some way combined in people with this ...
fundamental colour

fundamental colour  

Another name for a primary colour (1, 2, or 3). US fundamental color.
Grassmann's laws (perception)

Grassmann's laws (perception)  

Three basic laws of colour mixing. If x, y, and z are distinct stimulus colours, and if the symbol = indicates visual matching, then the laws state that: (a) If x = y, then x + z = y + z (if ...
Neo-Plasticism

Neo-Plasticism  

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Overview Page
A term coined by the Dutch artist Piet Mondrian (1872–1944) to describe the severely geometrical, abstract art he developed which he claimed was ‘denaturalized’, freed from the obligation of ...
opponent-process theory

opponent-process theory  

The theory of colour vision put forward by the German psychologist and physiologist Ewald Hering (1834–1918), or any of its more recent variants, according to which there are three classes of bipolar ...
protanomaly

protanomaly  

A form of partial colour-blindness resulting from an abnormality in the visual pigment that absorbs long-wave light, resulting in a partial loss of sensitivity to light in the red part of the visible ...
protanopia

protanopia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
n. a defect in colour vision in which affected individuals are insensitive to red light and confuse reds, yellows, and greens. Compare deuteranopia, tritanopia.

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