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Acilius Glabrio, Manius

Acilius Glabrio, Manius  

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(RE 38)son of (2), as praetor repetundarum (70 bc) presided over Verres' trial. Consul 67, he fought ineffectually against Mithradates VI until superseded by Pompey. ‘Lazy and negligent’ (Cicero ...
Aemilius Lepidus, Marcus

Aemilius Lepidus, Marcus  

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(RE 73) (the triumvir),younger son of M. Aemilius Lepidus (2). As praetor 49 bc, he supported Caesar, then governed Hither Spain (48–7), intervening in the dissensions in Further Spain ...
Aemilius Lepidus, Marcus

Aemilius Lepidus, Marcus  

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(RE 68)was a member of the embassy sent to the east in 201–200 bc, during the course of which he delivered the Roman ultimatum to Philip (3) V at ...
annales maximi

annales maximi  

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A chronicle kept by the pontifex maximus. Under the republic the pontifex maximus used to keep an annual record, and to publish a version of it outside the Regia on a whitened board, which was ...
Appius Claudius Caecus

Appius Claudius Caecus  

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Censor 312 before holding other high office; consul 307 and 296, praetor 295: in the latter two years he fought in Etruria (see etruscans), Campania, and Samnium. In 280, now old and blind, he ...
Augustus

Augustus  

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(63 bc–ad 14),the first Roman emperor; also called (until 27 bc) Octavian. He was adopted by the will of his great-uncle Julius Caesar and gained supreme power by his defeat of Mark Antony in 31 bc. ...
Caecilius Metellus (Creticus), Quintus

Caecilius Metellus (Creticus), Quintus  

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(RE 87)grandson of Macedonicus (below), became pontifex as a young man, urban praetor probably 73 bc (Magistrates of the Roman Pepublic 3. 38), and supported Verres at his trial ...
Cassius Longinus Ravilla, Lucius

Cassius Longinus Ravilla, Lucius  

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As tribune in 137 bc passed a law extending voting by ballot to trials before the assembly, except for treason. He was consul 127 and censor 125. Renowned for severity as a iudex (called ‘scopulus ...
Claudius Marcellus, Marcus

Claudius Marcellus, Marcus  

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(RE 225)succeeded his father (M. Claudius Marcellus (2)) as a pontifex in 177 bc. As tribune of the plebs in 171 he did not support veteran centurions who were ...
Clodius Pulcher, Publius

Clodius Pulcher, Publius  

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Youngest of six children of Claudius Pulcher, b. c.92 bc. In 68 he incited the troops of his brother‐in‐law Licinius Lucullus to mutiny in Armenia. On his return to Rome he had been apparently ...
collēgium

collēgium  

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1 (1) Magisterial or priestly: a board of officials.2 (2) Private: any private association of fixed membership and constitution (see clubs, roman).The principle of collegiality was a standard feature ...
comitia

comitia  

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In Rome the Comitium was the place of assembly. Comitia is a pl. word meaning an assembly of the Roman people summoned in groups by a magistrate possessing the formal right to convene them. He had to ...
commentarii

commentarii  

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‘memoranda’, were often private or businesslike, e.g. accounts, notebooks for speeches, legal notes, or teaching materials. Their public use developed in the priestly colleges (e.g. pontifices), and ...
consul

consul  

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In ancient Rome, one of the two annually elected chief magistrates who jointly ruled the republic; any of the three chief magistrates of the first French republic (1799–1804). The word derives ...
Cornelius Balbus, Lucius

Cornelius Balbus, Lucius  

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(RE 70)nephew of L. Cornelius Balbus (1) and distinguished as ‘Balbus minor’ in Cicero's letters, received the Roman citizenship with his uncle. In 49 and 48 bc he undertook ...
Cornelius Scipio Nasica Corculum, Publius

Cornelius Scipio Nasica Corculum, Publius  

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(RE 353)son of P. Cornelius Scipio Nasica, son-in-law of P. Cornelius Scipio Africanus, and father of P. Cornelius Scipio Serapio, served with distinction under L. Aemilius Paullus (2) in ...
Cornelius Scipio Nasica Serapio, Publius

Cornelius Scipio Nasica Serapio, Publius  

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In 133 he vigorously opposed his cousin Tiberius Sempronius Gracchus (2). When Gracchus mobilized a mob to seek re‐election as tribune, he was accused of aiming at tyranny, but the consul saw no ...
dedicatio

dedicatio  

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Transfer of a thing from the human into the divine sphere was accomplished through the act of dedicatio and consecrātiō, the former indicating surrender of an object into divine ownership, the latter ...
Ennius

Ennius  

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(239–169 bc),the father of Roman poetry, an Italian from Calabria. His Annals, of which 550 lines survive, show him to have achieved a rugged grandeur. Dryden mentions him in his critical essays, ...
flamines

flamines  

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(sing. flāmen), Roman priests within the college of the pontifices. There were three major, twelve minor flamines, each of them assigned to the worship of a single deity, though this did not preclude ...

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