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Polycrates

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Anacreon

Anacreon  

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(c. 570–478 bc),Greek lyric poet. The surviving fragments of his work include iambic invectives and elegiac epitaphs, but he is most famous for his poetry written in celebration of love and wine.
Arcesilas I, II, III, IV

Arcesilas I, II, III, IV  

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Second, fourth, sixth, and eighth kings of the Battiads, who ruled Cyrene from its foundation (c.630 bc) for some 200 years. Information on their reigns comes almost entirely from Herodotus ...
archers

archers  

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A soldier armed with bow and arrows. Archers have practised their deadly skill since prehistory in most parts of the world, for example, the Romans employed Scythian archers on horseback. In the ...
books, Greek and Roman

books, Greek and Roman  

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Books existed in Egypt long before they came into use in Greece. Systems of writing had been invented and developed for administrative purposes in both Egypt and Mesopotamia by c.3000 bc. While the ...
Delos

Delos  

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A small Greek island in the Aegean Sea, regarded as the centre of the Cyclades. In classical times it was considered to be sacred to Apollo, and according to legend was the birthplace of Apollo and ...
Dēmocēdēs

Dēmocēdēs  

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Of Croton in southern Italy (6th cent. bc), one of the most famous doctors (see medicine) of his time, and origin of Croton's medical reputation, practised in Aegina, Athens, and then for Polycrates ...
Greek letters

Greek letters  

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Letters in the Greek world could be written on metal, wax-coated wood, fragments of earthenware, animal skin, and (above all) papyrus (see books, Greek and Roman); a very early surviving ...
harbours

harbours  

Brit. harbour n. a place on the coast where vessels may find shelter, especially one protected from rough water by piers, jetties, and other artificial structures.
Ibycus

Ibycus  

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6th-cent. bclyric poet, native of Rhegium in southern Italy. His date is controversial. The Suidas states that he went to Samos in Olympian Odes 54 (564–560 bc), while Eusebius ...
Samos

Samos  

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An important polis on the large Aegean island of the same name (476 sq. km./184 sq. mi.), 1.8 km. (1 mi.) from Asia Minor. Though west and central Samos are each dominated by a mountain, Samos has ...
sea power

sea power  

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A country's naval strength, especially as a weapon of war.
Sparta

Sparta  

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The settlement developed at the northern end of the central plain of Laconia on land sloping eastwards to the marshy banks (hence ‘Limnae’: see below) of the river Eurotas and ...
Theodōrus

Theodōrus  

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Samian architect (see samos), sculptor, and metalworker, active c.550–520 bc. He made a massive silver mixing‐bowl dedicated by Croesus at Delphi, Polycrates' (1) famous ring, and a golden vine ...
tyranny

tyranny  

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(tyrannos, ‘tyrant’, was perhaps a Lydian word) was the form of monarchy set up by usurpers in many Greek states in the 7th and 6th cents. bc. The term first occurs in Archilochus. Tyranny was not a ...

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