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abuse

abuse  

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1 Violation of established uses in Classical architecture.2 Corruption of form. Abuses according to Palladio included brackets, consoles, or modillions supporting (or seeming to support) a major ...
acroterion

acroterion  

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[Co]The sculptured figure, tripod, disc, or urn, of bronze, marble, or terracotta, placed on the apex of the pediment of a Greek temple or other substantial building; sometimes also above the outer ...
angle-leaf

angle-leaf  

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One of four carved claws, griffes, leaves, or spurs projecting from the lower torus of a pier-base in medieval architecture covering one of the corners of the square plinth below. See spur
architrave

architrave  

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The lowest of the three main parts of an entablature that rests on the abacus of a column. The term is used more loosely to describe the moulded frame that surrounds a door or window. It can also be ...
Assyrian architecture

Assyrian architecture  

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When the Assyrians of Northern Mesopotamia became dominant in the region towards the end of the second millennium bc they took over principles of design established by their Sumerian predecessors. ...
Attic base

Attic base  

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Commonest type of base of a Classical column (used with all Orders except Greek Doric and (properly) Tuscan) consisting of (usually) a plinth over which is a large convex torus ring, a fillet, then a ...
Baldassare Longhena

Baldassare Longhena  

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 (1596/9–1682) Italian architect.From a prolific career as the architect of the city of Venice for 45 years, three works can be singled out.Santa Maria della Salute (1631–87) has ...
balustrade

balustrade  

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1 Row of balusters supporting a hand-rail of a stair.2 Series of balusters between pedestals, plinths, and copings or cornices, forming a type of parapet.
base

base  

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[from the Greek basis, ‘that on which one stands’]The lower portion of any structure or architectural feature. Also the lower part of an heraldic shield. See chief.
block

block  

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1 Piece of stone, terracotta, etc., prepared for building and bigger than a brick.2 Rectangular plain element at the bottom of a door-architrave, also stopping the skirt or plinth in Classical ...
blocking-course

blocking-course  

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1 Masonry or brickwork laid on a cornice to hold the latter down, as large projecting cornices are effectively cantilevers, and need weights or forces to anchor them and prevent them from falling.2 ...
brick

brick  

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[Ar]A kind of building material consisting of a block of dried or baked clay, often with some kind of tempering agent such as stone, sand, or straw. There are many different shapes, sizes, and styles ...
Corinthian Order

Corinthian Order  

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Classical Order of architecture, the third of the Greek Orders and the fourth of the Roman. Slender and elegant, it consists of a base (usually of the Attic type, often with further enrichment, or a ...
cyclopean

cyclopean  

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[De]A style of construction often applied to walls built not of ashlar masonry however big the blocks, but of large boulders of a size which called for giants to handle them, and with interstices ...
dado

dado  

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In classical architecture the portion of a pedestal between its base and cornice; in modern usage the lower portion of an interior wall when decorated separately.
earth-table

earth-table  

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Grass- or ground-table, or foot-stall, meaning the base-course or plinth of a building in Gothic work, or the lowest visible course of stone above the ground projecting in front of the naked of a ...
ecphora

ecphora  

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Projection of one part over another, e.g. a Classical column-base projecting beyond the shaft; or a plinth before the naked of a wall.
font

font  

Baptismal basin for the consecrated water used during the Sacrament of Baptism. It is commonly formed from a large block of stone, hollowed out and elaborately carved with Christian symbols, ...
Francis S. Swales

Francis S. Swales  

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(1878–1962).American architect. Educated in the USA and at the Atelier Jean-Louis Pascal and the École des Beaux-Arts, he was imbued with a sound training in the Classicism promoted in Chicago and ...
giant Order

giant Order  

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Classical Order of architecture, the pilasters or columns of which rise from the ground or plinth through more than one storey. Also called a Colossal Order. See also gigantic Order.

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