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Plato

(c. 429—347 bc)

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academies

academies  

Are societies or institutions for the cultivation and promotion of literature, the arts or science, or of some particular branch of science such as medicine, for example, the Académie de ...
academy

academy  

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Overview Page
The philosophical school of Plato; Akadēmeia was the name of the garden where Plato originally taught, named after the hero Akadēmos.
Academy of Athens

Academy of Athens  

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Overview Page
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Philosophy
Teaching college founded by Plato, around 387 bc. Although knowledge of its organization is fragmentary, it appears to have favoured a teaching method based on discussion and seminars. The ...
Achademycis

Achademycis  

‘the scoles of … Achademycis’ [L. Academicis studiis], the ‘Academy’, the school of philosophy founded by Plato (in a grove of olive trees near Athens sacred to the hero Academus), mentioned in Boece ...
acoustic

acoustic  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Music
(ă-koo-stik)of or relating to sound or the sense of hearing. a. nerve see cochlear nerve. a. neuroma see (vestibular) schwannoma.
Adrastus

Adrastus  

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(RE 7)of Aphrodisias, Peripatetic philosopher (2nd cent. ad). His influential writings included commentaries on the order of Aristotle's works (mainly philological); on Nicomachean Ethics and ...
aesthetics

aesthetics  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
(Greek sense perception)Kant keeps the ancient Greek usage, in which anything treating of sense perception may be called an aesthetic. The word had earlier been restricted by Baumgarten to the ...
Agathon

Agathon  

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Of Athens was the most celebrated tragic poet after the three great masters. (See tragedy, greek.) He won his first victory in 416 bc, and the occasion of Plato's Symposium is a party at his house in ...
Agaton

Agaton  

Who in The Legend of Good Women (F 526) is said by the narrator to have told how Alceste was turned into a constellation. His identity is uncertain. It has ...
Ailios Aristeides

Ailios Aristeides  

Rhetorician of the Second Sophistic; born 117 or 129, died ca.189.In the discussion of the relative values of philosophy and rhetoric, Aristeides took a clear stand against Plato and ...
akrasia

akrasia  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
(Greek, incontinence)The condition in which while knowing what it would be best to do, one does something else. The phenomenon intrigued Plato and Aristotle, because if we accept the Socratic ...
Alcinous

Alcinous  

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(c.2nd c. ad)Author of a ‘handbook of Platonism’ which is a useful source for the history of Platonism in its time.
Alcmaeon

Alcmaeon  

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Philosophy
(fl.450 bc) Greek philosopher and physicianAlcmaeon was born in Croton (now Crotone in Italy). Details of his work come from the surviving fragments of his book and through references by later ...
alcoholism

alcoholism  

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n. the syndrome due to physical dependence on alcohol, such that sudden deprivation may cause withdrawal symptoms – tremor, anxiety, hallucinations, and delusions (see delirium tremens). The risk of ...
Aldus Manutius

Aldus Manutius  

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(1449–1515)Scholar, printer, and publisher, born near Rome. He moved to Venice in 1490 and, after publishing his own Latin grammar (1493), in 1495 he opened his own press, which ...
Al-Kindi

Al-Kindi  

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Philosophy
(d. after ad 866)The earliest important Islamic philosopher, al-Kindi began the process of assimilating Neoplatonic and Aristotelian thought into the Islamic world. He taught in Baghdad, and was ...
Ammonios

Ammonios  

(᾽Αμμώνιος), teacher and commentator on Aristotle; born Alexandria late 5th C., died after 517.Ammonios imbibed paganism from his philosophically minded parents; after the death of his father ...
Ammonius

Ammonius  

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(2nd cent. bc),pupil and successor of Aristarchus (2) (scholiast Iliad 10. 397; Suda, entry under the name), wrote besides a commentary on Homer (Oxyrhynchus Papyri 2. 121), other works ...
Amphis

Amphis  

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Middle comedy poet. His 28 titles come chiefly from mythology or daily life, but Gynaecocratia (‘Government by Women’) sounds like an Aristophanic theme, and Dithyrambus (‘dithyramb’) may have dealt ...
analogy

analogy  

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Subject:
Religion
In common modern usage the word signifies a resemblance or similarity between objects of discourse. More technically analogy is a linguistic and semantic phenomenon which occurs when one word bears ...

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