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John Philoponus

(c. 490)

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Alexandrian School

Alexandrian School  

The school of Platonism coupled with Christian elements that flourished in Alexandria for the two centuries before the city was captured by Arabs in 642. Its most famous member was Hypatia.
Ammonios

Ammonios  

(᾽Αμμώνιος), teacher and commentator on Aristotle; born Alexandria late 5th C., died after 517.Ammonios imbibed paganism from his philosophically minded parents; after the death of his father ...
Aristotle

Aristotle  

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(384–322bce). Greek philosopherimportant in the early history of Western linguistics both for his general contributions to logic, rhetoric, and poetics and for a specific classification of speech ...
astrolabe

astrolabe  

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Overview Page
Subject:
History
An instrument used to make astronomical measurements, typically of the altitudes of celestial bodies, and in navigation for calculating latitude, before the development of the sextant. In its basic ...
astronomical instruments

astronomical instruments  

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Although the introduction of an astronomical instrument (the gnomon, an upright stick for measuring shadow-lengths) is credited to Anaximander in the 6th cent. bc, reliable information on the form of ...
Cosmas Indicopleustes

Cosmas Indicopleustes  

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Religion
(i.e. ‘Cosmas, the Indian navigator’, mid-6th cent.). He was a merchant of Alexandria, who may have become a monk. His ‘Christian Topography’ (c.547) attacks the Ptolemaic system in favour of various ...
John Buridan

John Buridan  

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Philosophy
(c.1300–after 1360)French scholastic philosopher. Buridan was educated under Ockham and taught at Paris, where he was also rector of the university. Little is known directly of Buridan's life, ...
John III Scholastikos

John III Scholastikos  

Patriarch of Constantinople (31 Jan. 565–31 Aug. 577); born Sirmis near Antioch ca.503 (L. Petit, DTC 8 [1947] 830), died Constantinople.First a lawyer (scholastikos) in Antioch, in 548/9 he ...
John Philoponus

John Philoponus (c.490–c.575)   Reference library

The Oxford Dictionary of the Middle Ages

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
89 words

After *Aristotelian commentaries that developed impetus (*motion) theory, he composed a refutation of the *eternity of the world

Kosmas Indikopleustes

Kosmas Indikopleustes  

Alexandrian merchant and (perhaps) later a monk, who traded in Ethiopia and the Red Sea, possibly also in India and Taprobana (Ceylon); fl. first half of 6th C.These travels ...
mathematics

mathematics  

Thanks to Boethius and Cassiodorus, arithmetic and geometry were part of the quadrivium together with astronomy and music. Bede developed a veritable science of computus, primarily to resolve the ...
matter

matter  

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Philosophy
That which occupies space, possessing size and shape, mass, movability, and solidity (which may be the same as impenetrability). Its nature was historically one of the great subjects of philosophy, ...
Michael of Ephesus

Michael of Ephesus  

(early 12th century) Byzantine Aristotelian commentator.His works were influential in the Latin MA, especially his commentary on some books of the Nicomachean Ethics. He probably worked as a ...
motion

motion  

A change in the position of a body or system with respect to time, as measured by a particular observer in a particular frame of reference. Only relative motion can be measured; absolute motion is ...
Neoplatonism

Neoplatonism  

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Literature
A philosophical and religious system developed by the followers of Plotinus in the 3rd century ad. Neoplatonism combined ideas from Plato, Aristotle, Pythagoras, and the Stoics with oriental ...
Nicomachus

Nicomachus  

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(RE 21),of Gerasa, Neopythagorean mathematician and musicologist (fl. c.ad 100); wrote (1) Introduction to Arithmetic (Ἀριθμητικὴ εἰ̑σαγωγή), in two books, on the Pythagorean theory of numbers (see ...
Philoponos, John

Philoponos, John   Reference library

Barry Baldwin and Alice-Mary Talbot

The Oxford Dictionary of Byzantium

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
History, Early history (500 CE to 1500)
Length:
457 words
scholar of philosophy, science, and theology; born ca.490, died after 567, or after 574 (Sorabji). Philoponos (Φιλόπονος) is a sobriquet meaning “lover of work” and may also refer to the ... More
Philoponus, John

Philoponus, John   Reference library

Thomas Pink

The Oxford Companion to Philosophy (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2005
Subject:
Philosophy
Length:
143 words
(c. 490–570s). From Alexandria, Philoponus opposed Aristotle's science, defending the Christian doctrine that the universe had a beginning. He argued thus: without a beginning, ... More
Philoponus, John

Philoponus, John   Reference library

Richard R. K. Sorabji

The Oxford Classical Dictionary (4 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2012
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
484 words

c. ad 490 to 570s, a Christian Neoplatonist (see neoplatonism) in *Alexandria (1), influenced subsequent science down to Galileo by replacing many of ...

Philoponus, John

Philoponus, John   Quick reference

Richard R. K. Sorabji

Who's Who in the Classical World

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2003
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
362 words

c. ad 490 to 570s,

a Christian Neoplatonist in Alexandria, influenced subsequent science down to Galileo by replacing many of ...

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