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analgesia

analgesia  

(an-ăl-jeez-iă)reduced sensibility to pain, without loss of consciousness and without the sense of touch necessarily being affected.
calculus

calculus  

A stone formed in an organ or duct; a concretion, usually of mineral salts, that forms in the body (the process of lithiasis). Kidney stones are usually of calcium oxalate.
dental hygienist

dental hygienist  

A trained person, licensed after formal assessment at the end of training, who is skilled in removal of tartar from dental enamel (“scaling”), flossing, topical application of fluoride paste, and ...
Down syndrome

Down syndrome  

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A congenital form of mental retardation due to a chromosome defect in which there are three copies of chromosome no. 21 instead of the usual two (see trisomy). The affected individual has a short ...
drug

drug  

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(drug)any substance that affects the structure or functioning of a living organism. Drugs are widely used for the prevention, diagnosis, and treatment of disease and for the relief of symptoms.
gingivitis

gingivitis  

(jin-ji-vy-tis)inflammation of the gums, which become swollen and bleed easily, caused by plaque at the necks of the teeth.
halitosis

halitosis  

(hal-i-toh-sis)bad breath. Causes of temporary halitosis include recently eaten strongly flavoured food; other causes include mouth breathing, periodontal disease, and infective conditions of the ...
herbal medicine

herbal medicine  

(herbalism) the use of plants or plant extracts for medicinal purposes in order to improve the body’s natural functions and restore balance. Herbal medicines are given in many forms (liquids, ...
HIV

HIV  

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(human immunodeficiency virus) a retrovirus responsible for AIDS. There are two varieties, HIV-1 and HIV-2; the latter is most common in Africa. See also htlv.
occlusal traumatism

occlusal traumatism  

Abnormal occlusal contacts resulting in damage to the periodontium (periodontal traumatism) or other supporting structures. Occlusal trauma has been investigated in relation to the progression of ...
open contact

open contact  

A region in which there is a failure of adjacent teeth to make contact with each other. It can be due to a developmental anomaly, abnormal tooth position, missing teeth, oral disease, habits such as ...
periodontal pocket

periodontal pocket  

A pathological deepening of the gingival sulcus (crevice) produced by the destruction of the supporting tissues and the apical migration of the epithelial attachment. The junctional epithelium is ...
periodontology

periodontology  

The specialty in dentistry concerned with the supporting structures of the teeth and the prevention and treatment of periodontal disease.
plaque

plaque  

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Any small patch or region of abnormal tissue within the body. See amyloid plaque, gliosis. [From French plaquer to plate, from Middle Dutch placken to beat metal]
Porphyromonas gingivalis

Porphyromonas gingivalis  

A Gram-negative, non-sporebearing anaerobic, rod-shaped bacterium associated with periodontal disease.http://www.pgingivalis.org The website of the Porphyromonas gingivalis Genome Project, with an ...
probing depth

probing depth  

The distance measured from the base of the pocket to the most apical point on the gingival margin. It dictates the patient's ability to maintain optimal plaque control. Probing depths in excess of ...
pyorrhoea

pyorrhoea  

A lay or antiquated term used to describe periodontal disease.
reattachment

reattachment  

The process whereby healthy supragingival periodontal fibres become reattached to bone or cementum following flap surgery to treat periodontal disease or for other oral surgical procedures. This ...
spirochaete

spirochaete  

n. any one of a group of spiral-shaped bacteria that lack a rigid cell wall and move by means of muscular flexions of the cell. The group includes the genera Borrelia, Leptospira, and Treponema.
tooth mobility

tooth mobility  

The horizontal or vertical displacement of a tooth beyond its normal physiological boundaries. It may be due to trauma, periodontal disease, occlusal traumatism, or loss of alveolar bone support. ...

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