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Pepin

(c. 714—768)

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Aachen

Aachen  

(town, palace) West central German town, known for its hot springs. Aachen’s significance is linked to Charlemagne, who created a Carolingian palace complex there, where he was buried. Successive ...
Aistulf

Aistulf  

(died 756)Aistulf was proclaimed King of the Lombards (and reigned 749–756) at Milan, while Pavia was still held by his brother and predecessor Ratchis (744–749), who retired to Monte Cassino.[...]
Carolingian Empire

Carolingian Empire  

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Overview Page
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Archaeology
The collection of territories in Western Europe ruled by the family of Charlemagne (768–814 ad) from whom the dynasty took its name. Charlemagne's ancestors, Frankish aristocrats, fought their way to ...
Carolingians

Carolingians  

The Carolingian family left its direct mark on history from the early 7th c. until 987. In a first stage, it had acquired the political responsibilities that gradually made it ...
chamberlain

chamberlain  

Originally in charge of the royal chamber and known as the master chamberlain, the office-holder had some financial responsibilities since part of the king's treasure was kept there. Later he ...
Charlemagne

Charlemagne  

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History
(Latin Carolus Magnus, Charles the Great) (742–814) King of the Franks (768–814) and Holy Roman emperor (as Charles I) (800–14). He created an empire by conquering and Christianizing the Saxons ...
Charles Martel

Charles Martel  

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(c. 688–741)(French, martel, ‘hammer’) Frankish leader. He was the son of Pepin II, ‘mayor of the palace’ under Merovingian rule. He gained control of the Austrasian province and defeated the ...
choir school

choir school  

Choir schools arose out of the scholae lectorum that, from the late Empire, employed very young children for the Readings and for singing the Psalms. In the 4th c., the ...
Christianity in France

Christianity in France  

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Religion
Christianity seems to have been introduced into Gaul in the 2nd cent. by missionaries from Asia Minor. The Christian community at Lyons suffered persecution in 177. A Gallic episcopate was ...
Church and State

Church and State  

[This brief review is designed to provide access to the numerous articles in the encyclopedia that deal with the complex of church-state relations in the sixteenth century.] Persistent conflict over ...
consecration of kings

consecration of kings  

In the late Middle Ages, the French term sacre had several different meanings: sacre was used for the consecration of Bishops the procession of the holy sacrament on Corpus Christi ...
Corbie

Corbie  

(abbey) Founded c.661 in the Amiens diocese, as the privilege of Bishop Berthefrid informs us, by Queen Balthildis and her son Clothar III. Its scriptorium played a fundamental role in transmitting ...
Echternach

Echternach  

The monastery of Echternach in Luxembourg was founded by St Willibrord in 698. A large number of fine MSS are associated with it; in the 11th cent. it became the royal atelier of the Salian Emperors ...
Einhard

Einhard  

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History
[Na]Aristocrat educated in the monastery of Fulda and later a friend and adviser of Charlemagne. After Charlemagne's death in ad 814 he was made abbot of a series of religious houses. Between ad 829 ...
Ferrara

Ferrara  

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History
Italian city of uncertain origin located in the east of the Po valley. In the 6th century Ferrara was controlled by the exarchate of Ravenna and in the 8th century ...
Gregorian Chant

Gregorian Chant  

Solo and unison plainsong choral chants assoc. with Pope Gregory I which became the fundamental mus. of the RC Church. See Plainsong.
His Catholic Majesty

His Catholic Majesty  

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Religion
Traditional title of the kings of Spain.
Lombards

Lombards  

A member of a Germanic people who invaded Italy in the 6th century, and who settled in what became Lombardy. The name of this people comes from Italian lombardo, representing late Latin Langobardus, ...
Merovingians

Merovingians  

A member of the Frankish dynasty founded by Clovis and reigning in Gaul and Germany c. 500–750. The word comes from the medieval Latin Merovingi ‘descendants of Merovich’ (semi-legendary 5th-century ...
Neustria

Neustria  

The western part of the Frankish empire in the Merovingian period. The name probably represents an unrecorded Frankish toponym meaning ‘new western dominion’, referring to the Franks' conquest of ...

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