Overview

Peloponnesian War

Return to overview »

You are looking at 1-20 of 88 entries

  • Type: Overview Page x
clear all

View:

Achaean Confederacy

Achaean Confederacy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Federal organization developed by the twelve Achaean cities united in cult of Zeus. First mentioned in 453 bc as Athenian allies, Achaea's independence was guaranteed in 446 (Thirty Years Peace). In ...
Agatharchus

Agatharchus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Painter, of Samos. He was the first to make a skēnē (stage building; see theatre staging, greek), for Aeschylus (probably for a revival at the time of the Peloponnesian War), and wrote a book on ...
Agis II

Agis II  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Spartan king of the Eurypontid house (the first to be given a name belonging naturally to the Agiads) from c.427 to 400 bc; he was son of Archidamus II. He achieved widespread prominence in 418, as ...
Agoracritus

Agoracritus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Parian sculptor, active c. 440–400 bc. A pupil of Phidias, he made a bronze Athena Itonia and Zeus/Hades for Coronea in Boeotia, a marble Mother of the Gods for the ...
Alcibiades

Alcibiades  

Reference type:
Overview Page
(c. 450–404 bc),Athenian general and statesman. He led the unsuccessful Athenian expeditions against Sparta and Sicily during the Peloponnesian War but fled to Sparta after being charged with ...
Alcidas

Alcidas  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Spartan commander in the early part of the Peloponnesian War, failed to help Mytilene in its revolt from Athens 428–7 and treated prisoners brutally (Thucydides 3. 17, 29–33) so creating ...
Amphiarāus

Amphiarāus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Seer descended from Melampus, resident at Argos, whence he joined the expedition of the Seven against Thebes. In one tradition, he died with all the other champions save Adrastus. Since he knew that ...
Archidamian War

Archidamian War  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Is the name given to the first decade (431–421 bc) of the main Peloponnesian War. The name derives from King Archidamus II of Sparta, who had, however, opposed the war. ...
Argos Amphilochicum

Argos Amphilochicum  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Traditionally founded by Amphilochus after the Trojan War, on the eastern shore of the Ambraciote Gulf. In its struggles against Ambracia (Thucydides 2. 68) it was helped by Athens and ...
art, funerary, Greek

art, funerary, Greek  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Archaic period(c.700–c.480). The period's chief innovations were the funerary statue and carved gravestone. Kouroi (standing, usually nude, youths) marked graves on Thera by c.630. Funerary korai ...
Aspasia

Aspasia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Milesian‐born partner of Pericles from c.445 bc when he divorced his wife. She is said to have taught rhetoric, and to have had discussions with Socrates. She was the target of attacks and jokes in ...
Astyochus

Astyochus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Spartan admiral, 412/411 bc, whose inadequacies at a critical early stage of the Ionian War (see Peloponnesian War) hindered Sparta's cause. Lacking adequate resources, he failed to sustain the ...
Athenian empire

Athenian empire  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The cities and islands mainly in the Aegean area that paid tribute to Athens in the 5th century bc. It developed out of the Delian League as Athens, by virtue of its great naval superiority, imposed ...
Athens

Athens  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The capital of Greece, originally a flourishing city state of ancient Greece, which was an important cultural centre in the 5th century bc.Athens of America Boston.Athens of the North Edinburgh.
Attica

Attica  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The territory of Athens, a triangular promontory some 2,400 sq. km. (930 sq. mi.) in area divided from the rest of the Greek mainland by the mountain range of Parnes. Attic topography is varied, with ...
autonomy

autonomy  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Free will; self-governing, ability of a person or a group to choose a course of action. Autonomy is a basic human right and is one of the principles of bioethics.
Bassae

Bassae  

Reference type:
Overview Page
In SW Arcadia, the site of one of the best‐preserved Greek temples. It was dedicated to Apollo the Helper (Epikourios). It dates to the latter part of the 5th cent. bc with an interruption due to ...
battle of Aegospotami

battle of Aegospotami  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The naval battle (405 bc) fought in the Hellespont, the strait between the Aegean Sea and the Sea of Marmara, that sealed the defeat of Athens in the Peloponnesian War. For five days the Athenian ...
Cephallenia

Cephallenia  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The largest of the western Greek islands, located between Leucas and Zacynthus, due west of the entrance to the Corinthian Gulf. Inhabited as early as the neolithic period, Cephallenia preserves ...
Clazomenae

Clazomenae  

Reference type:
Overview Page
One of the twelve cities of the Panionium, situated on the south shore of the gulf of Smyrna on a small island joined to the mainland by a causeway. The ...

View: