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bitts

bitts  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
In the days of sail, a frame composed of two strong pillars of straight oak timber, fixed upright in the fore part of the ship and bolted to the deck beams. To them were secured the cables when the ...
breaming

breaming  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
In the early days of sail, the method of cleaning the fouling off a ship's bottom by careening, and then burning off the seaweed, barnacles, etc., which had grown there through long immersion. The ...
devil

devil  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
The caulker's name for the seam in the upper deck planking next to a ship's waterways. No doubt they gave it that name as there was very little space to get at this seam to caulk it with a caulking ...
drag

drag  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
1 The amount by which a ship floats lower aft than forward. Almost all ships are designed, when in proper trim, to draw slightly more water aft than forward, to aid steering and to give the rudder a ...
holiday

holiday  

A gap unintentionally left uncovered when painting or varnishing on board ship. It is also a gap left, equally unintentionally, in paying a deck seam with oakum and pitch.
pay

pay v.   Reference library

The Oxford Essential Dictionary of the U.S. Military

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2002

seal (the deck or hull seams of a wooden ship) with pitch or tar to prevent leakage.

pay, to

pay, to   Quick reference

The Oxford Companion to Ships and the Sea (2 ed.)

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
History, Social sciences
Length:
103 words

a verb used during the days of sail, which had three meanings.

1 To pour hot pitch into a deck or side ...

pledget

pledget  

Reference type:
Overview Page
n. a small wad of dressing material, such as lint, used either to cover a wound or sore or as a plug. It is also used during operations, mounted on an instrument, to wipe away blood or other fluids.
to box off

to box off  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
In a square-rigged ship when tacking, to haul the head-sheets to windward and lay the head-yards flat aback to pay the ship's head out of the wind, when the action of the helm by itself is ...

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