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Acamas

Acamas  

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Son of Theseus and brother of Demophon (1). Unknown to the Iliad, the brothers are certainly present at Troy in the Iliu Persis (fr. 4 Davies), and free their grandmother ...
Antenor

Antenor  

(Walton: Troilus and Cressida). Bar. Capt. of the Trojans, he is captured by the Greeks and returned in exchange for Cressida. Created (1954) by Geraint Evans.
Caecilius Metellus, Lucius

Caecilius Metellus, Lucius  

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(RE 72)consul 251 bc, served in Sicily where, in June 250, he won a great victory over the Carthaginians at Panormus, capturing many elephants (the coins of the Caecilii ...
Constantinople

Constantinople  

The former name for Istanbul from ad 330 (when it was given its name by Constantine the Great) to the capture of the city by the Turks in 1453. Constantinople is the anglicized form of ...
Demophon

Demophon  

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1 Son of Theseus, often found paired with his brother Acamas. Both were sent to Euboea for safety, and from there (in the Epic Cycle) went to Troy, where they ...
Diomedes

Diomedes  

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In Greek mythology, a Thracian and son of Ares.horses of Diomedes the man-eating horses of Diomedes, which were captured as one of the Labours of Hercules.
Hagesander

Hagesander  

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Rhodian sculptors, active between 50 bc and ad 25. Pliny, Naturalis historia 36. 37f. mentions them as the authors of the Laocoön, found in Rome in 1516 and immensely influential ...
Ilus

Ilus  

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In mythology, (1) son of Dardanus (Apollodorus 3. 140). (2) His grand-nephew, son of Tros and father of Laomedon. He founded Ilium, being guided to the site by a cow (cf. Cadmus) and received the ...
invulnerability

invulnerability  

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Was commonly ascribed to the legendary heroes in the ‘cyclic’ epic tradition (see epic cycle), but is rigorously excluded from the Homeric poems (see homer) as incompatible with the principle that ...
Minerva

Minerva  

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Religion
[Di]Roman goddess of wisdom and patroness of arts and crafts. Identified with the Greek Athena and thereafter considered a goddess of war.
Odysseus

Odysseus  

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In Greek mythology, the king of Ithaca, renowned for his cunning and resourcefulness; in Latin, he is known as Ulysses.He is the central figure of the Odyssey, a Greek hexameter epic poem ...
Troilus and Criseyde

Troilus and Criseyde  

Chaucer's longest complete poem, in 8,239 lines of rhyme‐royal probably written in the second half of the 1380s. Chaucer takes his story from Boccaccio's Il Filostrato, adapting its eight books to ...
Vesta

Vesta  

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In Roman mythology, the goddess of the hearth and household. She was worshipped in a round building in the Forum at Rome, probably an imitation in stone of an ancient round hut. Her temple in Rome ...
visual qualities and visual arts

visual qualities and visual arts  

Readers are instantly struck by the vividness and the often sharply visual quality of Chaucer's writing, which evokes the surface appearance as well as the spirit of medieval life. We ...

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