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Orphism

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Adrasteia

Adrasteia  

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Religion
In the Orphic tradition in Greece, Adrasteia (“Necessity”) was present with Kronos (“Time”) at the beginning of existence.
Baubo

Baubo  

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Belongs to the main Orphic version of the Rape of Persephone (Asclepiades of Tragilus, Fragmente der griechischen Historiker 12. 4; Orphica Fragmenta 49–52 O. Kern; see Orphism). She resembles Iambe ...
Corybantes

Corybantes  

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Nature spirits, often confused with the Curetes. Like them they danced about the new-born Zeus, and they functioned together in Despoina's cult at Lycosura (Pausanias 8. 37. 6). They guard ...
Creation Myths

Creation Myths  

The essential metaphysical question that creation myths seek to answer is that of origins, or where things come from. The emergence of day from night, the growth of plants from ...
death

death  

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Religion
Since death is the cessation of life, it cannot be experienced, nor be a harm, nor a proper object of fear. So, at least, have argued many philosophers, notably Epicurus and Lucretius. A prime ...
Derveni

Derveni  

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See Dionysus (Derveni crater); Orphic literature; Orphism; palaeography, Introduction (Derveni papyrus); papyrology, Greek.
Derveni Papyrus

Derveni Papyrus  

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In 1962 a grave site was uncovered in the course of construction near Derveni, not far from Thessaloníki (ancient Thessalonica or Salonica). Among much to interest historians and archaeologists—most ...
Dionysus

Dionysus  

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In Greek mythology, a god, son of Zeus and Semele; his worship entered Greece from Thrace c.1000 bc. Originally a god of the fertility of nature, associated with wild and ecstatic religious rites, in ...
Ĕrōs

Ĕrōs  

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God of love. Eros personified does not occur in Homer, but the Homeric passages in which the word ĕrōs is used give a clear idea of the original significance. It is the violent physical desire that ...
Eros

Eros  

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In Greek mythology, the god of love, son of Aphrodite; his Roman equivalent is Cupid. The name comes via Latin from Greek, literally ‘sexual love’.A winged statue of Eros over the fountain in ...
Eubouleus

Eubouleus  

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(Εὐ̑βουλεύς), ‘the good counsellor’, was a major god in the Eleusinian mysteries, and played an important role in the myth presented in the secret rite: he brought Kore back from ...
European mythology

European mythology  

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Religion
Like most humans, the earliest mythmaking inhabitants of the European continent very likely thought of creation in terms of a feminine metaphor. The primary creative miracle in the purely animal ...
Greek mythology

Greek mythology  

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Religion
The religion or religions associated with the ancient Greeks produced one of the world's most complex and sophisticated mythologies, one that has particularly influenced the cultures of the Western ...
Greek papyrology

Greek papyrology  

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Papyrus, manufactured in Egypt from a marsh plant, Cyperus papyrus (see books, greek and roman), was the most widely used writing material in the Graeco‐Roman world. The object of papyrology is to ...
Greek purification

Greek purification  

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The concept of ‘purification’, like that of pollution, was applied in very diverse ways in Greek ritual. Many purifications were performed not in response to specific pollutions, but as preparation ...
Hipponium

Hipponium  

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A Locrian colony (see Locri Epizephyrii) founded c.600 bc, about which little is known. It fought against Dionysius (1) I in 388 and was sacked, but later rebelled against Syracuse. ...
hymn

hymn  

A religious song or poem, typically of praise to God or a god. Recorded from Old English, the word comes via Latin from Greek humnos ‘ode or song in praise of a god or hero’, used in the Septuagint ...
Iamblichus

Iamblichus  

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Religion
(c.250–c.330), the chief Neoplatonist of the Syrian school. He held an elaborate theory of mediation between the spiritual and physical worlds, radically modifying the doctrine of Plotinus by ...
Leda

Leda  

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In Greek mythology, the wife of Tyndareus king of Sparta. She was loved by Zeus, who visited her in the form of a swan; among her children were the Dioscuri, Helen, and Clytemnestra.
magic

magic  

Magic bullet a medicine or other remedy with wonderful or highly specific properties, especially one that has not yet been discovered. Recorded from the mid 20th century, the term may come from ...

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