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acre

acre  

A unit of area, the British statute acre being equal to 0.4047ha (4840 square yards or 10 square chains). Originally, unenclosed land and later enclosed, cultivated land; as a measure, probably the ...
Ælfric

Ælfric  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(c.945–c.1015), Anglo-Saxon abbot, prose writer, and educator. His works, including sermons, saints' lives, and biblical translations, were intended to teach both monastic novices and laypeople. His ...
Æthelred II

Æthelred II  

Was the son of king Eanred and succeeded him c.840. He was driven out by Raedwulf in 844, but restored later that year, dying c.848. Symeon of Durham reported that he had been murdered. A number of ...
alderman

alderman  

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Overview Page
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History
N.A senior member of a local authority, elected by its directly elected members. Active aldermanic rank now exists only in the City of London, having been phased out elsewhere by the Local Government ...
Alfred the Great

Alfred the Great  

(849–99)King of Wessex (871–99). Alfred's military resistance saved south‐west England from Viking occupation. He negotiated the treaty giving the Danelaw to the Norsemen (886). A great reformer, he ...
Anglo-Saxon Elegies

Anglo-Saxon Elegies  

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Overview Page
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Literature
Since the early nineteenth century, the term “Anglo-Saxon Elegies” (or “Old English Elegies”) has referred to a group of short poems, most of which are preserved in the eleventh-century Exeter ...
Anglo-Saxon Riddles

Anglo-Saxon Riddles  

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Overview Page
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Literature
Few poetic collections are as imaginative, funny, spiritually rich, or delightfully obscene as the group of Old English poems known as the Riddles. Preserved in the Exeter Book of Old ...
Battle of Maldon

Battle of Maldon  

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History
(August 991)A major battle fought near Maldon in Essex between the East Saxons, under the leadership of Byrhtnoth, and Danish raiders, led by Anlaf. The battle is the subject of a short but moving ...
Bede

Bede  

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History
(673–735,historian and scholar, when young placed in the charge of Benedict Biscop, the abbot of Wearmouth. From there he went in 682 to Jarrow, where he spent most of his life. He was a diligent ...
Beowulf

Beowulf  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
[Do]Anglo‐Saxon epic poem of the early 8th century ad or earlier, set among the Geats of Sweden. It is one of the longest and most complete examples of Anglo‐Saxon verse, shedding much light on the ...
bookland

bookland  

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Overview Page
The Old English name for land obtained by ‘book’ or written charter, hence the place‐name Buckland.
Caedmon

Caedmon  

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Overview Page
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Literature
(7th century), Anglo-Saxon monk and poet, said to have been an illiterate herdsman inspired in a vision to compose poetry on biblical themes. The only authentic fragment of his work is a song in ...
ceorl

ceorl  

A free peasant farmer of Anglo-Saxon England. In status ceorls were above the serfs but below the thanes (noblemen), with a Wergild of usually 200 shillings. They were liable to military service in ...
chapman

chapman  

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An itinerant pedlar of small general wares. The chapman’s importance to the book trade is that he supplied printed items to an unsophisticated public who would rarely, if ever, visit ...
clipping

clipping  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
1 A church ceremony, often held on Shrove Tuesday, whereby parishioners held hands to form a chain around the parish church to ward off evil spirits.2 The clipping of ...
Cynewulf

Cynewulf  

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Subject:
Literature
(late 8th–9th centuries), Anglo-Saxon poet. Modern scholarship attributes four poems to him: Juliana, Elene, The Fates of the Apostles, and Christ II. Each of these is inscribed with his name in ...
dialect

dialect  

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History
A distinct variety of a language, with its own variations of grammar and vocabulary, usually associated with a particular region within a country. Normally also associated with different accents, ...
Edmund

Edmund  

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Overview Page
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Religion
(841–69),king of East Anglia and martyr. Born of Saxon stock, Edmund was brought up as a Christian and became king of the East Angles before 865. In 869–70 the Great Army of the Vikings, under ...
Exeter Book

Exeter Book  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
A major manuscript of Old English poetry, containing some of the most famous shorter poems, such as The Wanderer and The Seafarer; it dates from c.940, and was given by Bishop Leofric (d. 1072) to ...
fens

fens  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Fen is an Old English word to describe the low‐lying, waterlogged areas of eastern England, particularly those draining into the Wash or the Humber. From the early Middle Ages onwards, if not before, ...

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