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Abraham Cowley

Abraham Cowley  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1618–1667) English poetPoetical Blossomes (1633) PoetryLoves Riddle (1638) DramaThe Mistresse; or, Severall Copies of Love-Verses (1647) PoetryThe Guardian (1650) DramaCutter of Coleman-Street ...
Anne Finch

Anne Finch  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1661–1720),poet, born near Newbury, the daughter of Sir William Kingsmill, and orphaned when young. In 1684 she married Colonel Heneage Finch, who succeeded to the title in 1712. She was a friend of ...
antistrophe

antistrophe  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(‘turning about’),in a Greek chorus, the response to the strophe, recited as the chorus proceeded in the opposite direction to that followed in the strophe. See Ode.
apostrophe

apostrophe  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(from Greek, ‘to turn away’),a figure of speech in which the writer rhetorically addresses a dead or absent person or abstraction.
Bard

Bard  

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Overview Page
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Literature
A Pindaric ode by Gray, published 1757, based on a tradition that Edward I ordered the violent suppression of the Welsh bards. It opens with the surviving Bard's cursing of the conqueror as he and ...
Charlotte Brooke

Charlotte Brooke  

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Overview Page
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Literature
(1740–93)Irish translator, daughter of Henry Brooke. Her dual language Reliques of Irish Poetry (1789) renders an annotated selection of Gaelic poems into polite English verse, providing the most ...
chorus

chorus  

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Overview Page
In ancient Greek tragedy, a group of performers who comment on the main action, typically speaking and moving together; a single character who speaks the prologue and other linking parts of the play, ...
Daniel Defoe

Daniel Defoe  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1660–1731),born in London, the son of James Foe, a butcher. He changed his name to Defoe from c.1695. He attended Morton's academy for Dissenters at Newington Green with a view to the ministry, but ...
Elizabeth Ryves

Elizabeth Ryves  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1750–97),poet, essayist, translator, and playwright. Born in Ireland, she moved to London in 1775 after losing property, through litigation, inherited from her father. Her first published work was ...
encomium

encomium  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
[in-koh-mi-ŭm](plural-mia)A composition in prose or verse written in praise of some person, event, or idea; a eulogy. Originally denoting a Greek choral song in praise of a victorious athlete, the ...
epideictic

epideictic  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Intended for display at public occasions. Epideictic oratory was one of the three branches of classical rhetoric, differing from legal argument or political persuasion in being devoted to public ...
epinicion

epinicion  

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Overview Page
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Literature
A kind of Greek ode composed in honour of a victor in the Olympic Games or equivalent festivals at Delphi and Corinth. Such odes were sung in chorus in a triadic structure of strophe, antistrophe, ...
epode

epode  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
[ep-ohd]The third part of the triadic structure used in the Pindaric ode and in Greek dramatic choruses, following the strophe and antistrophe and differing from them in length and metrical form. The ...
greater Romantic lyric

greater Romantic lyric  

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Overview Page
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Literature
A term devised by the American scholar M. H. Abrams in his essay ‘Structure and Style in the Greater Romantic Lyric’ (1965; reprinted in Abrams's book The Correspondent Breeze, 1984), to denote an ...
Henry Purcell

Henry Purcell  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Music
(1659–95),English composer. He composed many anthems and sacred works; songs for stage works by Dryden, Shadwell, D'Urfey, Southern, and others; a celebrated opera, Dido and Aeneas (1689, libretto by ...
heterometric

heterometric  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
Varied in metre. The term is applied to verse forms and stanzas or strophes in which lines of different lengths are found, usually arranged in a consistent order of variation and rhyming pattern ...
Horace

Horace  

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Overview Page
(65–8bc),Roman poet of the Augustan period. A notable satirist and literary critic, he is best known for his Odes, much imitated by later ages, especially by the poets of 17th-century England.
hymn

hymn  

A religious song or poem, typically of praise to God or a god. Recorded from Old English, the word comes via Latin from Greek humnos ‘ode or song in praise of a god or hero’, used in the Septuagint ...
Isaac Watts

Isaac Watts  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1674–1748),became a minister, but was forced into early retirement by ill health. He published four collections of verse, Horae Lyricae (1706), Hymns and Spiritual Songs (1707), Divine Songs for the ...
Isaiah

Isaiah  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A major Hebrew prophet of Judah in the 8th century bc, who taught the supremacy of the God of Israel and emphasized the moral demands on worshippers. Also, a book of the Bible containing his ...

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