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abbess

abbess  

The head of certain autonomous houses of nuns. The title is used among Benedictines, Cistercians, Trappists, Poor Clares, and some canonesses. The earliest known instance is in 514. In the Middle ...
abbey

abbey  

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Overview Page
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History
1 [De] A community of monks or nuns ruled by an abbot or abbess.2 [MC] A general term used to describe the buildings inhabited by a community of monks or nuns. See monastery.
abduction

abduction  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Law
N.Wrongfully taking away or detaining another person, usually by force or fraud. See child abduction; false imprisonment; kidnapping.
Agnes of Bohemia

Agnes of Bohemia  

Foundress and first abbess of the Franciscan (poor Clare) nuns (d. c.1282). A descendant of Duke Wenceslaus, daughter of Ottokar I king of Bohemia and his Hungarian royal wife, Agnes from early ...
Antonia Pulci

Antonia Pulci  

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Overview Page
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Literature
(1452–1501)Italian dramatist. The wife of Bernardo Pulci and later an uncloistered sister, Antonia wrote plays for performance by nuns or confraternities. Her plays continue the tradition of the ...
Augustine of Hippo, Rule of St

Augustine of Hippo, Rule of St  

A monastic Rule which exists in three main forms, two for men and one for women; their relationship is disputed. As there is no reference to a rule in St Augustine's Retractationes, his authorship ...
Beguines

Beguines  

A member of a lay sisterhood in the Low Countries, formed in the 12th century and not bound by vows; members were allowed to leave their societies for marriage. They are still represented by small ...
Bergen

Bergen  

Norwegian town. Bergen probably became a bishop’s seat and a legally confirmed urban community in the reign of King Olaf III Haraldsson (1067–93). The town grew into the all-important export ...
Camaldolese

Camaldolese  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
St Romuald founded a monastery at Camaldoli, near Arezzo, between 1012 and 1023; its ideal was the minimum of communal ties. A hospice which he founded at Fontebuona developed as a coenobitic house; ...
canoness

canoness  

The name was first used in the 8th cent. of communities of women who lived in common but did not renounce their property. They were later known as ‘secular canonesses’ and are now extinct. After the ...
Caterina Vigri

Caterina Vigri  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
(1413–63)of noble Ferrarese origin, left the Este court for a female lay religious community in 1426. She founded nunneries in Ferrara (1431) and Bologna (1455–6), becoming abbess of the ...
Christine Ebner

Christine Ebner  

(1277–1356) Dominican author of mystical revelations and of the Engelthal ‘Sisterbook’ (convent chronicle).Ebner also corresponded regularly with ‘Friend of God’ Henry of Nördlingen and collaborated ...
clausura

clausura  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
1 The practice of separating a part of a religious house to the exclusion of those of the opposite sex to the community, and sometimes even of lay persons of the same sex; and2 the portion so ...
Colette

Colette  

(1381–1447),Franciscan nun and reformer. Born at Calcye in Picardy, where her father was a carpenter at Corbie abbey, she was christened Nicolette Boylet. She grew up with a taste for prayer and ...
Colmar

Colmar  

Attested from 823, not far from the mother-parish of Horburg, Colmar (Columbarium) was the chief town of a fisc given by Louis the Pious to the abbey of Münster (founded ...
convent

convent  

1 Company of men or women living in the discipline of a religious Order and under one Superior.2 The institution founded for (1).3 A nunnery, i.e. a convent for women only.
Dillon

Dillon  

The family supposedly originated with Sir Henry de Leon's coming to Ireland as Prince John's secretary in 1185. He was granted lands in Longford, Westmeath, and Kilkenny. This marcher ...
Dominicans

Dominicans  

[Ge]A religious order of friars, known as Black Friars, introduced in the early 13th century ad and concerned to maintain the faith and convert the infidel.
Elementary Instruction

Elementary Instruction  

Christianity being a religion of the book, it was necessary for everyone, laity, clerics and monks, to have at least an elementary instruction. From the beginning of the Middle Ages ...
Elizabeth of Schönau

Elizabeth of Schönau  

(1129–1164)A mystic and ecstatic visionary, Elizabeth lived from 1141 at the monastery of Schönau, in the canton of Sankt Goarshausen, which housed a men's convent and a women's convent. ...

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