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Northumbria

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Aethelred I

Aethelred I  

Fourth son of Aethelwulf, was the third brother to hold the throne of Wessex, succeeding Aethelberht in 865. His reign, spent in incessant warfare against the Vikings, was one of mixed fortunes, ...
Angles

Angles  

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History
A member of a Germanic tribe closely linked to the Jutes and Saxons, thought to have originated in Schleswig‐Holstein or Denmark. In the 5th century they settled in eastern Britain in East Anglia and ...
Anglo-Latin literature to 1847

Anglo-Latin literature to 1847  

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Literature
From the 7th to the mid‐19th cents, thousands of English writers produced Latin writings in great quantity, both in prose and in verse, addressed to a Latin‐reading public in continental Europe and ...
Anglo-Saxon

Anglo-Saxon  

A person or language of the English Saxons, distinct from the Old Saxons and the Angles, a group of Germanic peoples who invaded and settled in Britain between the 5th and 7th centuries.
Anglo-Saxon Church

Anglo-Saxon Church  

The Church in England from the end of the 6th cent. to the Norman Conquest (1066). In 597 the Roman mission of St Augustine landed in Thanet in the south and sees were quickly set up at Canterbury, ...
battle of Fulford

battle of Fulford  

1066.Eight months after Harold Godwineson's succession in January 1066, Harold Hardrada, king of Norway, launched a major attack, in conjunction with Tostig, Harold's brother. They sailed up the Ouse ...
battle of Maserfield

battle of Maserfield  

642.*Penda of Mercia defeated and killed Oswald of Northumbria. Penda is said by Bede to have removed Oswald's head and hands and to have hung them on stakes, perhaps as an offering to a pagan god of ...
battle of the River Idle

battle of the River Idle  

616.According to Bede, Edwin, young son of Aelle, king of Deira, was driven out of the kingdom by Æthelfric, king of Bernicia, and at length took refuge with Rædwald, king of East Anglia. Rædwald ...
battle of Winwæd River

battle of Winwæd River  

655.Here Oswiu of Bernicia successfully challenged the overlordship of Penda of Mercia and was able to take temporary control of Mercia and permanent control of Deira. Penda was killed in the battle ...
Bernicia

Bernicia  

An Anglian kingdom founded in the 6th century ad, extending from the Tyne to the Forth and eventually united with Deira to form Northumbria.
Bible illustration

Bible illustration  

In the early Christian period single books or groups of books, rather than complete bibles, tended to be illustrated. The most commonly illustrated were the Pentateuch (the five books of ...
boundaries

boundaries  

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History
The study of boundaries involves a combination of fieldwork and documentary research. Old maps, place‐names such as Meersbrook, Anglo‐Saxon and medieval charters, law suits, and perambulations need ...
Britain

Britain  

The largest of the British Isles, including what is now called England, Wales, and Scotland. Until Roman times the island's inhabitants were dominantly Brythonic Celts, ancestors of the modern Welsh ...
Cadwallon

Cadwallon  

Son of Cadfan, succeeded c.625. Geoffrey of Monmouth related that he was brought up with Edwin of Northumbria, then a child refugee, but after Edwin had recovered his kingdom, they fell out. In 631 ...
Celtic church

Celtic church  

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History
This term, which describes the Christian church as it developed in Wales, Ireland, and Scotland, recognizes that church practice in all three countries had many features in common, but should not ...
Coifi

Coifi  

King Edwin’s chief (pagan) priest, he became a proponent of Christian conversion in Northumbria, c.625, according to Bede’s Historia ecclesiastica. Having counselled King Edwin to acknowledge ...
county

county  

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History
The county (otherwise the shire) was the main unit of provincial government in England from before the Norman Conquest until modern times. Domesday Book (1086) describes 32 shires. Five of these were ...
court poetry

court poetry  

Much of the Latin poetry composed in the MA was written for lay and ecclesiastical magnates and their households. Writers of such verse tended to be classically educated courtier-clerics, from ...
Cumberland

Cumberland  

Consisted of the western part of the Lake District, a surrounding coastal plain, and two outlying areas, a hilly district to the east towards Alston, and fertile lands north of Hadrian's Wall towards ...
Danelaw

Danelaw  

The part of north and east England occupied or administered by Danes from the late 9th century and administered according to their laws until the Norman Conquest.

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