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Nineveh

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Ashurbanipal

Ashurbanipal  

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Overview Page
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History
King of Assyria (c. 668–627bc). The grandson of Sennacherib, he was responsible for the sacking of the Elamite capital Susa and the suppression of a revolt in Babylon. However, he is chiefly ...
Assyria

Assyria  

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An ancient country in what is now northern Iraq, and which from the early part of the 2nd millennium bc was the centre of a succession of empires; it was at its peak in the 8th and late 7th centuries ...
Austen Henry Layard

Austen Henry Layard  

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Archaeology
Austen Henry Layard (1817–1894) was born in London and trained as a lawyer. In 1839, he and a fellow lawyer, Edward Mitford, set out to ride from England to Ceylon. ...
Babylon

Babylon  

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An ancient city in Mesopotamia, the capital of Babylonia in the 2nd millennium bc under Hammurabi. The city (of which only ruins now remain) lay on the Euphrates and was noted by Classical writers ...
Book of Jonah

Book of Jonah  

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Religion
Minor Prophet. The Book relates the Divine call to Jonah to go to Nineveh and preach repentance, his attempt to escape by sea, his being thrown overboard and swallowed by a fish, his deliverance ...
Book of Nahum

Book of Nahum  

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Religion
Minor Prophet. It predicts the fall of Nineveh (c.612 bc), which is regarded as so imminent that the Book is usually dated shortly before this event. The psalm at the beginning (1: 2–9 or 1: 2–2: 2) ...
Book of Tobit

Book of Tobit  

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Religion
This Book of the Apocrypha was written in Aramaic or Hebrew, probably c.200 bc. It relates the story of Tobit, a pious Jew who had been taken captive to Nineveh and in his old age became poor and ...
canal

canal  

Darius I completed the canal begun by Necho (see saïtes) to connect the Pelusiac branch of the Nile above (south of) Bubastis to the Red Sea. Ptolemy II built a longer canal, from the still undivided ...
Christian archaeology

Christian archaeology  

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Religion
The phrase commonly denotes the study of the monuments, as distinct from the documents, of early Christianity for the light they can throw on the thought and religious life of the Church, especially ...
cotton

cotton  

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History
[Sp]Bushy plant (Gossypinum hirsutum) with seeds covered in a soft white fibrous substance (lint) that can be made into thread. Native to Mesoamerica and parts of South America. Domesticated by ...
drunkenness

drunkenness  

Intoxication resulting from imbibing an excess of alcohol. It is an offence contrary to s 12 of the Licensing Act 1872 to be drunk in a public place.
Flood

Flood  

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Religion
The biblical flood said in Genesis ch. 6–9 to have been brought by God upon earth because of the wickedness of the human race, and from which only Noah and his family were saved; in extended usage, ...
Gentile

Gentile  

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Religion
A person who is not Jewish. The name is recorded from late Middle English and comes from Latin gentilis ‘of a family or nation, of the same clan’ (used in the Vulgate to refer to non-Jews) from gens, ...
Gilgamesh

Gilgamesh  

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Religion
A legendary king of the Sumerian city state of Uruk who is supposed to have ruled sometime during the first half of the 3rd millennium bc. He is the hero of the Babylonian epic of Gilgamesh, one of ...
Henry Rawlinson

Henry Rawlinson  

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Archaeology
(1810–1895), was born in Oxfordshire, England. He was appointed an officer cadet in the East India Company in 1827, and soon demonstrated a remarkable ability at languages, mastering five Eastern ...
Ishtar

Ishtar  

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Religion
A Babylonian and Assyrian goddess of love and war whose name and functions correspond to those of the Phoenician goddess Astarte.
Jonah

Jonah  

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Religion
Arabic Yunus. In the Quran, a prophet who symbolizes patience and perseverance. Jonah was swallowed by a fish when he tried to run away from God. According to tradition, he carried God's message of ...
Lachish

Lachish  

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Religion
A large city 48 km. (30 miles) SW of Jerusalem, much fought over, which has yielded important discoveries to archaeologists. It was captured by Joshua (Josh. 10: 31 f.), rebuilt by Rehoboam according ...
Medes

Medes  

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Archaeology
A member of an ancient Indo-European people whose homeland, Media, lay south-west of the Caspian Sea. In the 7th–6th centuries bc they were masters of an empire that included most of modern Iran and ...
Nahum

Nahum  

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Religion
(in the Bible) a Hebrew minor prophet. Also, a book of the Bible containing his prophecy of the fall of Nineveh (early 7th century bc).

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