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amphetamine

amphetamine  

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A drug, 1-phenyl-2-aminopropane (or a derivative of this compound), that stimulates the central nervous system by causing the release of the transmitters noradrenaline and dopamine from nerve ...
Andreas Vesalius

Andreas Vesalius  

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(1514–64)Belgian physician and anatomist, who was a professor at Padua for six years before becoming a physician to the Habsburg court. He is remembered for producing in 1538–43 definitive text and ...
biofeedback

biofeedback  

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n. the giving of immediate information to a subject about his or her bodily processes (such as heart rate), which are usually unconscious, by means of monitoring devices. This may enable some ...
blood sugar

blood sugar  

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The concentration of glucose in the blood, normally expressed in millimoles per litre. The normal range is 3.5–5.5 mmol/l. Blood-sugar estimation is an important investigation in a variety of ...
brain

brain  

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n. the enlarged and highly developed mass of nervous tissue that forms the upper end of the central nervous system (see illustration). The average adult human brain weighs about 1400 g (approximately ...
central nervous system

central nervous system  

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(CNS) the brain and the spinal cord, as opposed to the cranial and spinal nerves and the autonomic nervous system, which together form the peripheral nervous system. The CNS is responsible for the ...
Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease

Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease  

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(peroneal muscular atrophy) a group of inherited diseases of the peripheral nerves, also known as hereditary sensorimotor neuropathy, causing a gradually progressive weakness and wasting of the ...
chiropractic

chiropractic  

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A specialty focusing on the non-surgical diagnosis, treatment, and management of neuromuscular skeletal conditions by means of manipulation of the spine and related ...
development and growth: early childhood

development and growth: early childhood  

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The transformation that occurs in the first five years of life is extraordinary. William Blake speaks of the baby at the time of birth:My mother groan'd: My father weptInto the ...
endocrine system

endocrine system  

In vertebrates, the system of ductless glands which secrete into the blood stream hormones which act on a target elsewhere in the body. See also pituitary ...
euphoria

euphoria  

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n. a state of optimism, cheerfulness, and wellbeing. A morbid degree of euphoria is characteristic of mania and hypomania. See also ecstasy, elation.
exercise

exercise  

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Muscular activity that requires energy expenditure, using inspired oxygen to transform and metabolize carbohydrates. Aerobics or Aerobic exercise maximizes this process. Calisthenic exercise ...
fatty acid

fatty acid  

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Organic acids with long, straight hydrocarbon chains, commonly with an even number of carbon atoms. Low concentrations are present in tissues but the majority are constituents of triglycerides and ...
glia

glia  

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(neuroglia) n. the special connective tissue of the central nervous system, composed of different cells, including the oligodendrocytes, astrocytes, ependymal cells (see ependyma), and microglia, ...
grey matter

grey matter  

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Part of the tissue that makes up the central nervous system of vertebrates. It is brown-grey in colour, consisting largely of nerve cell bodies, synapses, and dendrites. The grey matter is the site ...
human body

human body  

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Physical structure of a human. It consists of water, protein and other organic compounds, and some minerals. The skeleton consists of more than 200 bones, sheathed in voluntary muscle to ...
motor neuron

motor neuron  

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A neuron that transmits nerve impulses from the central nervous system to an effector organ (such as a muscle or gland) and thereby initiates a physiological response (e.g. muscle contraction).
myelin

myelin  

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(my-ĕ-lin)a complex material formed of protein and phospholipid that is laid down as a sheath around the axons of certain neurones, known as myelinated (or medullated) nerve fibres.
nerve

nerve  

A cordlike structure that transmits impulses either from the brain or spinal cord to muscles and glands (motor nerves), or in the opposite direction from the sense organs to the brain and spinal cord ...
neurology

neurology  

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n. the study of the structure, functioning, and diseases of the nervous system (including the brain, spinal cord, the peripheral nerves, and muscles). —neurological adj. —neurologist n.

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