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natural selection

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abaptation

abaptation  

The process by which an organism is fitted to its environment as a consequence of the characters it inherits, which have been filtered by natural selection in previous environments. Because present ...
adaptation

adaptation  

1 (in evolution) Any change in the structure or functioning of successive generations of a population that makes it better suited to its environment. Natural selection of heritable adaptations ...
adaptive value

adaptive value  

The property of a given genotype when compared with other genotypes that confers fitness (q.v.) to an organism in a given environment.
Alfred Russel Wallace

Alfred Russel Wallace  

(1823–1913)British naturalist, who in 1848 went on an expedition to the Amazon, and in 1854 travelled to the Malay Archipelago. There he noticed the differences between the animals of Asia and ...
Alloparental Care

Alloparental Care  

Alloparental care is parentlike behavior that is typically performed by individuals that are not the parent of the recipient. The term, coined by E. O. Wilson in 1975, was intended ...
apostatic selection

apostatic selection  

A type of selection which operates on a polymorphic species. Classically, the term is used in relation to prey species that have several different morphological forms. It occurs when, in proportion ...
aristogenesis

aristogenesis  

An outmoded theory holding that evolution proceeds along a determined path. (The modern view is that natural selection does not direct evolution towards any particular kind of organism or ...
artificial life

artificial life  

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While processes of selforganization, reproduction, learning, adaptation and evolution are in nature confined to the biological sphere, they can be duplicated in principle in computer simulations, ...
artificial selection

artificial selection  

The choosing by humans of the genotypes contributing to the gene pool of succeeding generations of a given organism.
balanced polymorphism

balanced polymorphism  

A genetic polymorphism that is stable and is maintained in a population by natural selection, because the heterozygotes for particular alleles have a higher adaptive value (i.e. fitness) than either ...
Baldwin effect

Baldwin effect  

An idea advanced in 1896 by US psychologist James Mark Baldwin (1861–1934) and others to explain the social evolution of traits that are learned during the lifetime of individuals. Originally called ...
Beagle

Beagle  

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History
Length/beam/draft: 27.5 m × 7.5 m × 3.8 m (90.3′ × 24.5′ × 12.5′). Tonnage: 235 builder’s measurement. Hull: wood. Complement: 75. Armament: 5 × 6-pounders, 2 × 9-pounders. Designer: Sir Henry Peake. ...
behavioural ecology

behavioural ecology  

1 The study of the behaviour of an organism in its natural habitat.2 The application of behavioural theories (e.g. game theory) to particular activities (e.g. foraging).
blind watchmaker

blind watchmaker  

A term coined in 1986 by the British ethologist Richard Dawkins (born 1941) to denote natural selection, alluding to the Argument from Design, an argument for the existence of God put forward in 1802 ...
camouflage

camouflage  

An adaptation that matches the shape, design, or colour of an animal to a particular type of background, so the animal is hidden from predators when it rests against that background with its markings ...
canalization

canalization  

A developmental process that is held within narrow bounds despite both genetic and environmental disturbing forces. Development is such that all the different genotypes have a standard phenotype over ...
Charles Darwin

Charles Darwin  

(1809–82)British naturalist, who studied medicine in Edinburgh followed by theology at Cambridge University, intending a career in the Church. However, his interest in natural history led him to ...
co-adaptation

co-adaptation  

The development and maintenance of advantageous genetic traits, so that mutual relationships can persist. Predator–prey and flower–pollinator relationships often exhibit examples of co-adaptation, ...
co-evolution

co-evolution  

A process in which the simultaneous evolution of two or more organisms, such as a predator and its prey, is dependent on or influenced by their mutual interaction or relationship.
coloration

coloration  

The colour patterns on an animal's body surface. These are usually tailored to the animal's lifestyle, and have important functions in relation to advertisement, camouflage, mimicry, ...

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