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morpheme

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allomorph

allomorph  

One of the variant forms assumed by a single morpheme in different circumstances, such as each of the forms of the negating prefix in- in the words indirect, irreducible, improbable, and ignoble. ...
articulation

articulation  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Media studies
1. In oral communication, control of the voice so as to produce clear and distinct sounds in speech.2. (semiotics) Structural levels within semiotic codes—which are divisible into those with single ...
bound form

bound form  

A morpheme that cannot occur on its own as a word, such as the prefix un- or the suffix -tion in English. Also called a bound morpheme. Compare free morpheme.
free morpheme

free morpheme  

A morpheme that can occur on its own as a word, such as tree. Compare bound form.
inflection

inflection  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
1. The modulation of vocal intonation or pitch.2. A change in the form of a word to indicate a grammatical function: e.g. adding the letter ‘s’ to make a simple plural in English.3. Often used in ...
kinemorph

kinemorph  

The smallest unit of kinesic behaviour having a distinctive function. Compare morpheme. [A blend of kine(sic) and morph(eme)]
lexeme

lexeme  

A word, in the sense of a dictionary entry. Distinct string of letters may be forms of the same lexeme (‘fills’, ‘filled’, ‘filling’); conversely, identical strings of letters (bank, the institution, ...
logograph

logograph  

A representation of a complete morpheme, word, or phrase in a single character or symbol, as in the writing systems of China and Japan or internationally recognized symbols such as % for per cent, ÷ ...
mean length of utterance

mean length of utterance  

The mean or average number of morphemes or words in a sample of speech, often used as a crude index of the level of linguistic development of a child. MLU abbrev.
morphology

morphology  

1. (linguistics) The study of the internal structure of words: see also morpheme; compare syntax.2. More generally, the study of the forms of things, as in Propp's Morphology of the Folktale (1928): ...
phoneme

phoneme  

(linguistics) The smallest sound unit in a language. Meaningless in themselves, phonemes are the building-blocks of language. Changing one for another changes the meaning of a word, as with /p/ and ...
phrase-structure grammar

phrase-structure grammar  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
A form of generative grammar that describes the relations between words and morphemes of a sentence, but does not analyse syntactic relations in greater depth.
pseudomorpheme

pseudomorpheme  

A portion of a word that resembles a morpheme but is not, in fact, one. For example, in the word history, the portion his is a pseudomorpheme, appearing to some people to be a morpheme and ...
sentence

sentence  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Philosophy
Most generally, the unit of communication: the smallest entity whose production constitutes a message, such as an assertion, a command, or a question. Given such factors as variations of phonetics or ...
syntax

syntax  

The arrangement of words and phrases to create well-formed sentences in a language. Recorded from the late 16th century, the word comes via French or late Latin from Greek suntaxis, from sun- ...
Word-and-Paradigm Model

Word-and-Paradigm Model  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Linguistics
The phrase “word and paradigm” refers to a model of morphology that was usual in the Western tradition until the development of morphemics in the mid-20th century. Since 1960 it ...

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