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abbot

abbot  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(Aram., Syr., abba, ‘father’).The head of a Christian monastic community, especially in the Benedictine or Cistercian traditions. The term is used in translation for the head of communities in ...
Abruzzi

Abruzzi  

The Abruzzi covered the whole south-east part of the duchy of Spoleto. The region was characterised by the weakness of its urban network, destroyed at the time of the Lombard ...
Adalard of Corbie

Adalard of Corbie  

(751–826)A cousin of Charlemagne, Adalard was raised at court with his brother Wala. He retired to Corbie where, after a stay at Monte Cassino, he returned as abbot (780). ...
Aistulf

Aistulf  

(died 756)Aistulf was proclaimed King of the Lombards (and reigned 749–756) at Milan, while Pavia was still held by his brother and predecessor Ratchis (744–749), who retired to Monte Cassino.[...]
Amatus

Amatus  

Bishop, possibly of Paestum-Capaccio or Nusco (E.Cuozzo, Benedictina 26 [1979] 323–48), and monk of Montecassino; born Salerno ca.1010, died ca.1083? Amatus wrote several Latin poetical works and a ...
annals

annals  

(from Latin annus, ‘year’) The yearly records kept by the priests in Rome from the earliest times. They noted ceremonies, state enactments, and the holders of office. The high priest (Pontifex ...
Arabic medicine in the Latin West

Arabic medicine in the Latin West  

Medical texts had been written in Arabic in the Islamic world by Christian, Jewish, and Muslim doctors from the late 8th century onwards. The earliest translations of these medical works ...
Ars dictaminis

Ars dictaminis  

The ars dictaminis is the variety of medieval rhetoric that provided instruction in the composition of letters and other epistolary documents. Between 1077 and 1085, Alberic of Monte Cassino produced ...
art and architecture: Benedictine

art and architecture: Benedictine  

The Benedictine houses of monks and nuns founded throughout Europe from the middle of the 6th century onwards, although connected by little or no supra-regional hierarchy, shared several ...
Art and the West

Art and the West  

While the dedication of Constantinople as the new Rome symbolized imperial and artistic unity and Constantinople was patterned after old Rome in its topography and monuments, their shared traditions ...
Benedictine

Benedictine  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A monk or nun of an order following the rule of St Benedict. From the original Benedictine foundations at Subiaco and Monte Cassino in Italy the number of monastic houses in Europe grew to many ...
Capua

Capua  

Reference type:
Overview Page
By c.600 bc, Capua was an Etruscan city and head of a league of twelve cities. The surrounding area was known as the ager Campanus (see campania). After 474, when the Etruscans were defeated by a ...
Carolingian Renaissance

Carolingian Renaissance  

What is designated the Carolingian Renaissance took place during the reign of Charlemagne, and was characterized by a rebirth of classical learning inspired by Alcuin and Theodulf of Orléans. ...
Cassinese Congregation

Cassinese Congregation  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A monastic congregation of Benedictine monks which owes its origin to a reform initiated by Ludovico Barbo at Padua in 1409. The aim of the reformers was to overcome the evil of appointing abbots in ...
Cluny

Cluny  

A Benedictine monastery in eastern France, founded in 910 and introducing a period of monastic reform based on strict observance of the Benedictine Rule; the abbey was subject only to the pope, and ...
congregation, monastic

congregation, monastic  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
A group of monasteries united under a superior, usually known as the Abbot President or Abbot General. The purpose of the union is to foster good discipline, but individual monasteries remain ...
Constantine The African

Constantine The African  

(11th c.)The Middle Ages have given several versions of the biography of Constantine the African. According to Peter the Deacon, monk and librarian at the abbey of Monte Cassino ...
Constantinus Africanus

Constantinus Africanus  

(1015?–87×99) Teacher and translator into Latin of Arabic medical texts;later regarded in his own right as a great medical authority.Constantinus was born in Tunis in North Africa and ...
cursus

cursus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Literature
We call “cursus” the types of rhythmic structures, based on the place of the tonic accent of the words, that characterised the ends of phrases in artistic Latin prose. This ...
Desiderius of Monte Cassino

Desiderius of Monte Cassino  

(c.1027–1087)Born at Benevento, abbot of Monte Cassino from 1058 to 1087, Pope under the name of Victor III in 1086–1087. This member of a princely Lombard family became a ...

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