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abbreviation

abbreviation  

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Overview Page
The Web and the Internet float on a flood of abbreviations. They are often used to save time when posting to a newsgroup or writing an email. This dictionary contains most of the common abbreviations ...
Agapitus II

Agapitus II  

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Religion
(10 May 946–Dec. 955)The successor of Marinus II, he owed his promotion to Alberic II (c. 905–54), prince of Rome and from 932 to 954 its all-powerful ruler. Except that he was a Roman by birth, ...
Chrismon

Chrismon  

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The sacred monogram, an arrangement of the first three Greek letters (Chi, Rho, and Iota) of XPIΣTOΣ Christ's name, also called Christogram, which suggests the Cross as well as pax (peace). Another ...
epigraphy

epigraphy  

The term “epigraphy”comes from the Greek epigráphein, “to write on”. It designates what is written to be brought to public knowledge in a lasting way. To ensure this publicity, inscriptions ...
Glass Weights

Glass Weights  

Small disks (diam. approximately 1.7–2.5 cm) of colored glass—mostly yellow, green, or blue—used as exagia. Their derived weights correspond to the solidus, semissis, and tremissis; they would have ...
palaeography

palaeography  

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Overview Page
Is the study of the history of writing upon papyrus (see papyrology), wax, parchment, and paper, while epigraphy deals with inscriptions carved in hard materials; from it we learn how to read old ...
rings

rings  

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Religion
The ring is considered an emblem of fidelity. Those in Christian use include: (1) In the W., episcopal rings. Rings are first mentioned as an official part of a bishop's insignia of office in the 7th ...
seal

seal  

A piece of wax, lead, or other material with an individual design stamped into it, attached to a document to show that it has come from the person who claims to have issued it. Recorded from Middle ...
see

see  

The place in which a cathedral church stands, identified as the seat of authority of a bishop or archbishop. The word comes (in Middle English, via Anglo-Norman French) from Latin sedes ‘seat’.
Unguentarium

Unguentarium  

A conventional term applied to a well-attested type of small (approximately 18–21 cm in height) pottery flask, fusiform in shape—with a short tubular mouth marked off from the body by ...

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