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Abhayagiri

Abhayagiri  

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Overview Page
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Religion
A major ancient monastic complex in Anurādhapura.Sri Lanka.also known as Uttaravihāra. Founded by King Vaṭṭagāmaṇi Abhaya in the 1st century bce it consisted of a monastery (vihāra) and a stūpa.but ...
Abhidharma-dīpa

Abhidharma-dīpa  

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Religion
‘Lamp of Abhidharma’, being a Sarvāstivādin Abhidharma text of uncertain authorship, though sometimes thought to have been composed by Vasumitra in response to Vasubandhu's Abhidharma-kośa. The text, ...
Abhidharma-samuccaya

Abhidharma-samuccaya  

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Religion
An Abhidharma text composed in prose by the Yogācārin scholar-monk Asaṇga. Largely Mahāyāna in orientation, the treatise conforms in structure to the pattern of traditional Abhidharma texts. This ...
Aggavaṃsa

Aggavaṃsa  

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Religion
A monk of the region of Pagān in Burma who lived in the 12th century. He composed a Pāli grammar in 1154.
Ajahn Chah

Ajahn Chah  

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Religion
(1918–92).Thai monk andmeditation teacher (ajahn) who founded the Wat Pah Pong forest retreat in Thailand. Later renamed Wat Pah Nanachat, this became a training centre for Westerners, and many of ...
ajari

ajari  

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Religion
(Jap.). Term deriving from the Sanskrit word ācārya and meaning a senior monk who is qualified to take disciples, teach novices, and conduct ordinations. In Japan.such monks might also serve as ...
Amarapura Nikāya

Amarapura Nikāya  

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Religion
One of the three major Nikāyas (monastic lineages) of modern Sri Lanka.taking its name from the city of Amarapura in Burma with which it is associated. It broke off from the Syāma Nikāya in 1803. Its ...
ango

ango  

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Overview Page
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Religion
(Jap; Chin., An-chü).In Chinese and Japanese Buddhism.this is a three-month period of retreat for Buddhist clerics (see monk; nun). It is usually held during the summer, but can be held in winter as ...
Aṇgulimāla

Aṇgulimāla  

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Religion
The son of a Brahmin and a notorious and feared bandit who was converted in a famous encounter with the Buddha. His name, which means ‘garland of fingers’, derived from his macabre practice of ...
Anuruddha

Anuruddha  

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Religion
1 A close companion of the Buddha, who was present at his death. To him is attributed the recitation and thus preservation of Anguttara-Nikāya.2 Theravādin Buddhist scholar of uncertain ...
āraṇya-vāsī

āraṇya-vāsī  

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(Skt.). A forest-dweller; name given to monks who choose to emulate the lifestyle of the Buddha and the early Saṃgha by dwelling in sparsely populated rural areas. The term especially applies to ...
Aśoka

Aśoka  

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Religion
Emperor of India c. 269–232 bc, who was converted to Buddhism and established it as the state religion.Asoka pillar a pillar with four lions on the capital, built by the Emperor Asoka at Sarnath in ...
Atiśa

Atiśa  

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Religion
(c.980–1055).The short name of Atiśa Dīpaṃkāra Śrījñāna. Born in Bengal into a royal family, he was a renowned Buddhist scholar and monk who later became one of the leading teachers at the university ...
Bankei Eitaku

Bankei Eitaku  

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Religion
(1622–93).Bankei was a Rinzai monk who lived during the Tokugawa period in Japan. During this time, the government required all families to register with a zen temple for record-keeping purposes, and ...
begging-bowl

begging-bowl  

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Religion
(Skt., pātra; Pāli, patta).A bowl used by Buddhist monks to collect food on their daily almsround. The Vinaya states that monks may use bowls made of either iron or clay, and they can be either ...
Benedict Biscop

Benedict Biscop  

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Religion
(628–89),founder and first abbot of Wearmouth, scholar, and patron of the arts. He was born of a noble Northumbrian family, and, as Biscop Baducing (his family name), was in the service of the ...
Ben'en;

Ben'en;  

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Religion
1202–80).Japanese Zen master of the Rinzai Yogi school. In 1242, he became abbot of the Tōfuku-ji (monastery) in Kyōto. Enni was thus a man of wide education, but while ...
Bhāradvāja

Bhāradvāja  

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Religion
Name of an ancient Brahmin clan (gotra), many members of which are mentioned in the Pāli Canon as residing at Rājagṛha.Śrāvastī.and surrounding regions. Many members of the clan visited the Buddha ...
bhikṣu

bhikṣu  

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Religion
(Skt.; Pāli, bhikkhu).A Buddhist monk.an ordained member of the Saṃgha. The etymology of the term is uncertain, as is that of its female equivalent, a nun or bhikṣunī. During the lifetime of the ...
Bhutan

Bhutan  

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Subject:
History
Bhutan's development objective is to maximize ‘gross national happiness’Bhutan has three main geographical zones. The north falls within the high Himalayas which reach altitudes of 7,300 metres. To ...

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