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Adams-Onís Treaty

Adams-Onís Treaty  

An agreement made between the United States and Spain in 1819, in which Spain ceded Florida to the United States and relinquished its claims to Oregon, and the United States ...
blues

blues  

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Overview Page
Subject:
Music
Slow jazz song of lamentation, generally for an unhappy love affair. Usually in groups of 12 bars, instead of 8 or 16, each stanza being 3 lines covering 4 bars of music. Tonality predominantly ...
canal

canal  

Darius I completed the canal begun by Necho (see saïtes) to connect the Pelusiac branch of the Nile above (south of) Bubastis to the Red Sea. Ptolemy II built a longer canal, from the still undivided ...
Dams and Hydraulic Engineering.

Dams and Hydraulic Engineering.  

In colonial America, small streams powered rural grist mills and sawmills. In the early nineteenth century, entrepreneurs built factories powered by the flow of large rivers; the Lowell mills in ...
David Glasgow Farragut

David Glasgow Farragut  

(1801–70) first U.S. Navy admiral, born at Campbell's Station, Tennessee. His military career at sea began in his childhood during the War of 1812 but came into prominence only with ...
French Settlements in North America.

French Settlements in North America.  

Because official French interest in North America began with the desire to find the fabled Northwest Passage to the riches of Asia, the crown lost interest in North America for ...
Fur Trade.

Fur Trade.  

Animal pelts have probably been exchanged in North America since the beginning of human habitation, but large-scale fur trade began only after the arrival of Europeans. As the Eastern Hemisphere's ...
Henry Schoolcraft

Henry Schoolcraft  

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Literature
(1793–1864),American ethnologist and author. Henry Rowe Schoolcraft was a pioneering ethnologist, author, Indian agent, geologist, and explorer credited with first determining the true source of the ...
Hernando De Soto

Hernando De Soto  

(c. 1500–42)Spanish conquistador and explorer. De Soto took part in the conquest of Central America, before joining Francisco Pizzaro's expedition in Peru; he returned to Spain when the Inca King ...
Indian History and Culture

Indian History and Culture  

OverviewMigration and Pre-Columbian EraDistribution of Major Groups, circa 1500From 1500 to 1800From 1800 to 1900From 1900 to 1950Since 1950The Indian in Popular CultureOverviewMigration and ...
Indian Removal Act

Indian Removal Act  

A law passed on May 28, 1830, to relocate eastern Indian tribes to land west of the Mississippi. Promoted by President Andrew Jackson in order to acquire land within state ...
Indian Wars.

Indian Wars.  

Warfare between whites and Indians began when the first colonists set foot in the New World. Whites posed a threat to Indian lands and way of life. For four centuries ...
Jacques Cartier

Jacques Cartier  

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History
(1491–1557), navigator, explorer, merchant.His Voyages, probably written by others based on his ships' logs, are the earliest descriptions of the landscape of mainland Canada and Native life along ...
Jacques Marquette

Jacques Marquette  

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Literature
(1637–75),French Jesuit missionary and explorer, came to Canada in 1666. In 1673 with Jolliet he descended the Mississippi to the mouth of the Arkansas, establishing the existence of a ...
John Charles Frémont

John Charles Frémont  

(1813–90)US explorer and politician. He was responsible for exploring several viable routes to the Pacific across the Rockies in the 1840s. He made an unsuccessful bid for the presidency in 1856, ...
Louisiana Purchase

Louisiana Purchase  

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History
The territory sold by France to the US in 1803, comprising the western part of the Mississippi valley and including the modern state of Louisiana. The area had been explored by France, ceded to Spain ...
lumbering.

lumbering.  

From the early Colonial Era, European settlers tapped North America's forests. Initially, lumbering was more an adjunct of farming than an industrial activity. In the early eighteenth century, ...
Mallet, Pierre, and Paul Mallet

Mallet, Pierre, and Paul Mallet  

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History
French-Candian traders and explorers. The Mallet brothers were born into a French-Canadian family that lived in Montreal before moving to Detroit and was much involved in the western fur trade. ...
Maritime Transport.

Maritime Transport.  

Water-borne transportation has been central to the American economy since Europeans first crossed the Atlantic. Oceans, bays, and rivers offer surfaces across which heavy vessels can be moved with ...
Mason-Dixon Line

Mason-Dixon Line  

In the US, the boundary between Maryland and Pennsylvania, taken as the northern limit of the slave-owning states before the abolition of slavery; it is named after Charles Mason (1730–87) and ...

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