Overview

Minoan civilization

Return to overview »

You are looking at 1-20 of 66 entries

View:

Aegean Bronze Age Civilizations

Aegean Bronze Age Civilizations  

Reference type:
Overview Page
For the art produced during the Greek Bronze Age (c. 3600–c. 1100bc) on Crete see Minoan, in the Cyclades see Cycladic, and on the Greek mainland see Helladic. The Mycenaean civilization is covered ...
Aegean Cultures

Aegean Cultures  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
OverviewCycladic CultureMinoan CultureHelladic (Mycenaean) CultureMycenaeOverviewCycladic CultureMinoan CultureHelladic (Mycenaean) CultureMycenaeThe Bronze Age civilizations of the Aegean basin, ...
archers

archers  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A soldier armed with bow and arrows. Archers have practised their deadly skill since prehistory in most parts of the world, for example, the Romans employed Scythian archers on horseback. In the ...
Ares

Ares  

Reference type:
Overview Page
In Greek mythology, the war god, son of Zeus and Hera; his Roman equivalent is Mars.
arms and armour

arms and armour  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
Personal weapons and protective clothing used in combat or for ceremonial purposes, regarded as objects of beauty as well as of practical use. In Europe armourers have invariably been workers in ...
art, funerary, Greek

art, funerary, Greek  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Archaic period(c.700–c.480). The period's chief innovations were the funerary statue and carved gravestone. Kouroi (standing, usually nude, youths) marked graves on Thera by c.630. Funerary korai ...
Artemis

Artemis  

Reference type:
Overview Page
In Greek mythology, a goddess, daughter of Zeus and sister of Apollo. She was a huntress and is typically depicted with a bow and arrows, and was also identified with Selene, goddess of the moon; her ...
Arthur Evans

Arthur Evans  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
Arthur John Evans (1851–1941) was the son of John Evans, a paper manufacturer and highly respected archaeologist. He inherited his love of the past from his father, using his microscopic ...
botany

botany  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The scientific study of plants, including their anatomy, morphology, physiology, biochemistry, taxonomy, cytology, genetics, ecology, evolution, and geographical distribution.
cannibalism

cannibalism  

[De]The practice of eating human flesh, normally either out of dire need or for ceremonial purposes. The latter is more common, and usually related to a belief that eating parts of deceased relatives ...
Cnossus (Greek and Roman)

Cnossus (Greek and Roman)  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A town on Crete. It flourished from the 9th to the 6th cent., to judge from the evidence of large numbers of tombs (protogeometric to orientalizing periods), but seems to ...
Crete

Crete  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
History
A Greek island in the eastern Mediterranean, noted for the remains of the Minoan civilization which flourished there in the 2nd millennium bc.Cretan bull the bull captured by Hercules as the seventh ...
Cyclades

Cyclades  

Reference type:
Overview Page
A large group of islands in the southern Aegean Sea, regarded in antiquity as circling around the sacred island of Delos.
Cycladic

Cycladic  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Name applied to the Bronze Age art and civilization of the Cyclades (a group of islands in the Aegean Sea between Greece and Turkey), flourishing from about 2500 bc to ...
Dionysus

Dionysus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
In Greek mythology, a god, son of Zeus and Semele; his worship entered Greece from Thrace c.1000 bc. Originally a god of the fertility of nature, associated with wild and ecstatic religious rites, in ...
double axe

double axe  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Archaeology
[Ar]A shaft‐hole axe with a symmetrically set cutting blade at either end, found in stone, copper, and bronze in prehistoric Europe. In Minoan Crete the double axe was an extremely common religious ...
finance, Greek and Hellenistic

finance, Greek and Hellenistic  

Reference type:
Overview Page
The collective deployment of resources by the community inevitably has socio-political implications (who pays? who benefits?). But public finance in Greek states rarely had economic aims beyond the ...
garden

garden  

A plot of ground on which plants (flowers, vegetables, fruits, or herbs) are cultivated. See also horticulture, market garden.
gems

gems  

Minerals (usually of crystallized matter) used for decorating items such as textiles and liturgical objects or for personal adornment. The most highly prized are the precious stones, diamonds, ...
Greece

Greece  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Greece has seen considerable benefits from EU membership but has now fallen deep into debtMost of Greece is mountainous. The mainland is dominated by the rugged Pindus Mountains, which extend from ...

View: