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Menelaus

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Aerope

Aerope  

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Daughter of Catreus, king of Crete, and given by her father to Nauplius (2) to be sold overseas. She married Atreus (or, in some versions, Pleisthenes) and gave birth to ...
Agamemnon

Agamemnon  

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In Greek mythology, king of Mycenae and brother of Menelaus, commander-in-chief of the Greek forces in the Trojan War. On his return home from Troy he was murdered by his wife Clytemnestra and her ...
ambrosia

ambrosia  

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In Greek and Roman mythology, the food of the gods, associated with their immortality. The word comes (in the mid 16th century) via Latin from Greek, ‘elixir of life’, from ambrotos ‘immortal’.
Amyclae

Amyclae  

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An ‘Achaean’ centre on the right bank of the Eurotas river c.5 km. (3 mi.) south of Sparta, mentioned in the Homeric Catalogue as in the domain of Menelaus (1). ...
Antilochus

Antilochus  

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In mythology, son of Nestor, mentioned several times in the Iliad as a brave warrior and a fine runner (e.g. 15. 569–70). He brings Achilles the news of Patroclus' death ...
Astyoche

Astyoche  

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In mythology sister of Priam and daughter of Laomedon (Apollodorus mythographus 3. 146). She married Telephus (1)) (Quintus Smyrnaeus 6. 135) and bore Eurypylus who came to the Trojan War ...
Atreus

Atreus  

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In Greek legend, the son of Pelops and father of Agamemnon and Menelaus. He quarrelled with his brother Thyestes and invited him to a banquet at which he served up the flesh of Thyestes' own ...
Deiphobus

Deiphobus  

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In mythology, son of Priam and Hecuba, and one of the more powerful Trojan fighters. Athena impersonated him so as to deceive Hector and cause his death. After Paris had been killed, Deiphobus ...
Elysium

Elysium  

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In Greek mythology, the place at the ends of the earth to which certain favoured heroes were conveyed by the gods after death. The name comes via Latin from Greek Elusion (pedion) ‘(plain) of the ...
Epeius

Epeius  

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1 son and successor as king of Elis of Endymion (Pausanias 5. 1. 4).2 Son of Panopeus, and builder, with Athena's help, of the Wooden Horse (Odyssey 8. 493). ...
Epic Cycle

Epic Cycle  

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A collection of early Greek epics, artificially arranged in a series so as to make a narrative extending from the beginning of the world to the end of the heroic age. Apart from the Iliad and Odyssey ...
Euphorbus

Euphorbus  

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In mythology, a Dardanian, son of Panthoos, who wounded Patroclus (Iliad 16. 806ff.), and was afterwards killed by Menelaus (1) (17. 45ff.). Pythagoras (1) claimed to have been Euphorbus in ...
Greek mythology

Greek mythology  

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The religion or religions associated with the ancient Greeks produced one of the world's most complex and sophisticated mythologies, one that has particularly influenced the cultures of the Western ...
Hector

Hector  

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In myth, son of Priam and Hecuba, husband of Andromache and father of Astyanax, and the greatest of the Trojan champions. In the Iliad he first appears leading the Trojans out to battle; he ...
Helen

Helen  

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In Greek mythology, the daughter of Zeus and Leda, born from an egg. In the Homeric poems she was the outstandingly beautiful wife of Menelaus, and her abduction by Paris (to whom she had been ...
Helenus

Helenus  

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In mythology, son of Priam, warrior and prophet. In the Iliad he gives prophetic advice to Hector (6. 76, 7. 44), and is wounded by Menelaus (1) at the battle ...
Hermione

Hermione  

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1 daughter of Menelaus and Helen, the wife first of Neoptolemus, then of Orestes;2 in Shakespeare's The Winter's Tale, the wife of Leontes.
Homer

Homer  

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(8th century bc),Greek epic poet. He is traditionally held to be the author of the Iliad and the Odyssey, though modern scholarship has revealed the place of the Homeric poems in a pre-literate oral ...
Iliad

Iliad  

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A Greek hexameter epic poem in twenty-four books, traditionally ascribed to Homer.The poem tells of the climax of the Trojan War between Greeks and Trojans. The greatest of the Greek heroes, ...
Leda

Leda  

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In Greek mythology, the wife of Tyndareus king of Sparta. She was loved by Zeus, who visited her in the form of a swan; among her children were the Dioscuri, Helen, and Clytemnestra.

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