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Mahābhārata

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Abhijñānaśākuntalam

Abhijñānaśākuntalam  

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Religion
c.4th to 5th century ce)A Sanskrit drama by Kālidāsa, widely considered the most perfect example of the form. Based on an episode in the Mahābhārata, it tells the story of the love of King Duṣyanta ...
Abhimanyu

Abhimanyu  

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Religion
One of the Pāṇḍava faction in the Mahābhārata; son of Arjuna and Subhadrā. At the age of sixteen, he is killed in a cowardly fashion on the thirteenth day of the war against the Kauravas, leaving his ...
adharma

adharma  

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Religion
(Skt.).In Hinduism, the opposite of dharma, synonym of pāpa: evil, sin, what is not right or natural, or according to śāstras.Adharma is personified in Hindu mythology as the ...
Adhiratha

Adhiratha  

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Religion
In the Mahābhārata, the name of Karṇa's foster-father.
Ādiparvan

Ādiparvan  

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Religion
The first book of the Sanskrit Mahābhārata, providing its framing stories, listing various genealogies, and recounting the birth, education, and alliances of the main protagonists.
Aeneid

Aeneid  

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Literature
An epic poem in Latin hexameters by Virgil, recounting the adventures of Aeneas after the fall of Troy.
Agastya

Agastya  

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Religion
A great Vedic sage said to have been born of Mitra and Varuṇa in a large earthenware pot (kumbha), hence known as Kumbhayonī. He is the legendary pioneer of the Āryan occupation of peninsular ...
Agni

Agni  

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Religion
The Vedic god of fire, the priest of the gods and the god of the priests.
Ahalyā

Ahalyā  

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Religion
The wife of the ṛṣi Gautamā. She committed adultery with Indra, the King of the Heavenly region. When Gautamā discovered her infidelity, he cursed her and, in some versions, made ...
ahimsa

ahimsa  

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Religion
In the Hindu, Buddhist, and Jainist tradition, respect for all living things and avoidance of violence towards others. The word comes from Sanskrit, from a ‘non-, without’ + hiṃsā ‘violence’.
Akrūra

Akrūra  

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Religion
In the Mahābhārata the name of Kṛṣṇa's paternal uncle, one of the Vṛṣṇi generals who dies in the final battle.
akṣa

akṣa  

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Religion
A die for gambling; a nut used as a die. The archaeological record shows that gambling with dice or their eqivalent has been popular in India since the period of the Indus valley civilization. A hymn ...
Amar Chitra Katha

Amar Chitra Katha  

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India’s longest-running series of comic books. Started in 1967 by Anant Pai, it is published by India Book House (see oxford & ibh). Issued in almost 20 Indian and foreign ...
Amaracandra

Amaracandra  

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(13th century ce)The author of a kāvya epic, the Bālabhārata (based on the Mahābhārata), which was produced in Gujarat in the 13th century, and subsequently became popular in Rajasthan.
Ambā

Ambā  

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Religion
One of the names of the Hindu Goddess. Literally it means ‘mother’, like the related ammā/ammaṉ. A particular goddess-figure is denoted by it only in the context of regional cults centred on ...
Ambālikā

Ambālikā  

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Religion
Pāṇḍu's mother in the Mahābhārata. She turned pale during intercourse with Vyāsa, hence her son was born sickly pale.
Ambikā

Ambikā  

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Religion
1 Another name for the goddess Durgā. Iconographically, the name may be reserved for Durgā when she is seated on, or attended by, a lion or tiger. The name is also applied to Umā (Parvatī), and to ...
Āndhra Bhāratamu

Āndhra Bhāratamu  

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Religion
A Telugu version of the Mahābhārata, begun by Nannaya around 1025 ce, and completed by Tikkana Somayājī and Errana in the 13th–14th centuries.
animiṣa

animiṣa  

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Religion
This refers to a characteristic of the gods: unlike humans, they are unblinking. Various stories (for example, the Nala episode of the Mahābhārata) make use of this as a means of recognizing deities ...
Anugītā

Anugītā  

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Religion
Part of the Āśvamedhikaparvan of the Mahābhārata, containing an address by Kṛṣṇa to Arjuna, supposedly based on their earlier discourse in the Bhagavadgītā, but, on the grounds of style and ...

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