Update
The Oxford Biblical Studies Online and Oxford Islamic Studies Online have retired. Content you previously purchased on Oxford Biblical Studies Online or Oxford Islamic Studies Online has now moved to Oxford Reference, Oxford Handbooks Online, Oxford Scholarship Online, or What Everyone Needs to Know®. For information on how to continue to view articles visit the subscriber services page.
Dismiss

You are looking at 1-20 of 76 entries

  • Type: Overview Page x
clear all

View:

Adoptianism

Adoptianism  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
1 The heresy, originating in Spain in the 8th cent., according to which Christ, in His humanity, is not the true, but only the adopted, Son of God. Elipandus, Abp. of Toledo, arguing against ...
Albert Behaim

Albert Behaim  

(c.1180–c.1260) German cleric, born and educated near Niederaltaich, Bavaria;*canon in Passau from 1212; went to Rome for the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215, remaining there in a diplomatic post. ...
architect

architect  

In the fifteenth century, anyone who was concerned with erecting a building, even by supervising financial arrangements, could be called an architect. The specialized profession of architect, in ...
banking, finance, and taxation

banking, finance, and taxation  

Medieval financial and fiscal institutions owed little to ancient precedents, but were produced by the distinctive social, political, and economic features of medieval Europe. Medieval business ...
Besançon

Besançon  

In the eastern French Franche-Comté region, Besançon is strategically located, surrounded on three sides by the river Doubs and on the fourth by a mountain. Passing from Roman to Alamannic ...
bridge-building brotherhoods

bridge-building brotherhoods  

(late 12th–mid 15th century) Three independent corporations in the Rhône valley whose members, primarily laymen, dedicated themselves to the construction, maintenance, and/or fiscal management of ...
Burgundians

Burgundians  

A series of age-old migrations led the Burgundians from their native Scandinavia all through Germany, from the shores of Pomerania (late 2nd c. BC) to the banks of the Rhine ...
Burgundy

Burgundy  

A region and former duchy of east central France, centred on Dijon. Under a series of strong dukes Burgundy achieved considerable independence from imperial control in the later Middle Ages, before ...
Byzantine Church

Byzantine Church  

The Byzantines did not develop a systematic Ecclesiology. For them, the Church was not a society parallel to secular society, obeying carefully codified laws. It was a spiritual reality whose ...
commendation

commendation  

Ceremony involving kneeling, the joining of hands, and oath-taking, which was used to formalize a relationship in which one participant was subordinated to another. Used in Carolingian times and from ...
conclave

conclave  

In the Roman Catholic Church, the assembly of cardinals for the election of a pope; the meeting place for such an assembly. The word is recorded from late Middle English (denoting a private room) and ...
Crosiers

Crosiers  

Several religious orders (military or hospitaller) bore the name “Crosiers” (French Croisiers), due to their particular devotion to the Holy cross: the Canons Regular of the Holy Sepulchre ...
Durand of Mende, Guillaume, the Elder

Durand of Mende, Guillaume, the Elder  

(died 1296)There were two bishops of Mende named Guillaume Durand, the uncle, bishop from 1286 to 1296, and his nephew and successor. It is the uncle, called the Speculator ...
Eudes Rigaud

Eudes Rigaud  

(c.1215–1275)Sprung from the petty nobility, Eudes Rigaud entered the Friars Minor in 1236. His qualities as a theologian led to his becoming one of the “four masters”, authors in ...
Felix

Felix  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(d. 818), Bp. of Urgel in Spain and one of the leaders of the Adoptianist heresy. He was charged as a heretic at the Council of Ratisbon (792) and recanted. He later became convinced of his heresy ...
Florus

Florus  

Reference type:
Overview Page
Subject:
Religion
(d. c.860), deacon of Lyons and a canon of the cathedral church. When Amalarius tried to make changes in the liturgy, Florus attacked him in a number of works, including the Expositio Missae. In the ...
Fossanova

Fossanova  

By a concession of Innocent II to the Cistercians in 1133, concerning an 8th-c. Benedictine monastery founded from Monte Cassino, on the southern margin of the Pontine Marshes in the ...
Fredegisus (Fredegis, Fridugisus) of Tours

Fredegisus (Fredegis, Fridugisus) of Tours  

(d. 834) A pupil and favourite of Alcuin’s.In about 800, he wrote a short treatise On the Substance of Nothing and of Darkness, in which he argues that, because ...
Friars of the Sack

Friars of the Sack  

The Order of Penitence of Jesus Christ, also called Friars of the Sack by reason of their coarse clothing, was founded in 1248 by a knight of Hyères connected with ...
Gallican liturgy

Gallican liturgy  

The expression “Gallican liturgy” would be more exact if used in the plural, since there was no unified liturgy for the whole of Frankish Gaul (less the Narbonnaise where the ...

View: