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Alyattēs

Alyattēs  

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Fourth Lydian king (c.610–560 bc), of the house of Gyges and father of Croesus, finally drove back the Cimmerians, extended Lydian control to the Halys, and made war on Cyaxarēs the Mede (585), ...
Amasis

Amasis  

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Became pharaoh (see Egypt, pre-ptolemaic; Saites) in 570 bc as champion of the native Egyptians against Apries. Though initially restricting Greek activities (e.g. channelling all trade through ...
Anahita

Anahita  

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Overview Page
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Religion
(Anaitis, Ἀναίτις), Persian goddess of the fertilizing waters (Avesta Yašt 5). Artaxerxes (2) II (404–358 bc) introduced the use of cult-images into the major cities of his empire (Berossus in ...
Asia Minor

Asia Minor  

The term ‘Asia Minor’ denotes the westernmost part of the Asian continent, equivalent to modern Turkey between the Aegean and the Euphrates. The west and south coastal fringes were part of the ...
Asia, Roman province

Asia, Roman province  

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Attalus III of Pergamum bequeathed his kingdom to the Romans. After his death in 133 bc it was constituted as provincia Asia. Originally it consisted of Mysia, Troas, Aeolis, Lydia, Ionia (see ...
Cimmerians

Cimmerians  

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Subject:
Archaeology
[CP]Bronze Age nomadic communities occupying the Russian steppes north of the Black Sea during the later 2nd millennium bc, well known in the archaeological literature for their horse‐riding skills. ...
Cleitus

Cleitus  

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‘the White’ (d. 318 bc), Macedonian officer, held senior infantry and cavalry commands under Alexander (3) the Great (from 327) and returned to the west with Craterus (1) and the ...
Croesus

Croesus  

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(6th century bc),last king of Lydia c. 560–546bc. Renowned for his great wealth, he subjugated the Greek cities on the coast of Asia Minor before being overthrown by Cyrus the Great.
Cybele

Cybele  

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A mother goddess worshipped especially in Phrygia and later in Greece (where she was associated with Demeter), Rome, and the Roman provinces, with her consort Attis.
Cyrus

Cyrus  

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Religion
Cyrus (II) “the Great” founded the Persian (Achemenid) empire in 559 BCE and controlled the ancient Near East by the time of his death in 530. “Cyrus” may have been ...
Ephesus

Ephesus  

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Subject:
Religion
In NT times Ephesus was the capital of the Proconsular Province of Asia and an important commercial centre. It was the scene of important labours of St Paul and traditionally the home of the aged St ...
Erythrae

Erythrae  

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One of the twelve cities of the Ionian League (see Panionium), on the coast opposite the island of Chios. Allegedly founded by a party from Crete, and later by Ionians ...
Etruscan language

Etruscan language  

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The Etruscan language is no longer obscure and mysterious, even if there are still large gaps in our knowledge of its grammar and lexicon and in our understanding of the texts—larger than is the case ...
Greek coinage

Greek coinage  

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DefinitionsCoinage to the Greeks was one of the forms of money available to measure value, store wealth, or facilitate exchange. Coins were made from precious metal such as gold or silver, or from a ...
Gyges

Gyges  

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King of Lydia (c. 680–645 bc), founded the Mermnad dynasty by murdering King Candaules and marrying his widow (Herodotus 1. 8–14; cf. Plato Respublica 2. 359d). The word tyrant (see ...
Herodotus

Herodotus  

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(5th century bc),Greek historian. Known as ‘the Father of History’. He was the first historian to collect his materials systematically, test their accuracy to a certain extent, and arrange them in a ...
imperialism

imperialism  

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History
N.a policy of extending a country's power and influence through diplomacy or military force: the struggle against Western imperialism.imperialistic adj. imperialistically adv.n.a policy of extending ...
Lydia

Lydia   Reference library

The Grove Encyclopedia of Classical Art and Architecture

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2007
Subject:
Art & Architecture, Classical studies
Length:
1,374 words
Illustration(s):
1

Region in western Asia Minor (now Turkey) that formed an independent kingdom ruled from Sardis during the 7th century

Lydia

Lydia   Reference library

The Oxford Encyclopedia of Ancient Greece and Rome

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2010
Subject:
Classical studies, History
Length:
809 words

Rising to power in the eighth century bce, Lydia was an extensive kingdom covering much of western Anatolia after

Lydia

Lydia   Quick reference

World Encyclopedia

Reference type:
Subject Reference
Current Version:
2004
Subject:
Encyclopedias
Length:
54 words

Ancient kingdom of w Asia Minor. Under the Mermnad dynasty (c.700–547 bc), it was a powerful and

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